Posts Tagged Latin America

This Week in Feminism South of the Border

Image translation: “While some breathe in, others expire.” Photo cred

For those of us who have family, friends and ties beyond borders, and those of us who care about global feminism, here’s a few tidbits on what our allies south of the border are up to.

Guyana’s Chief Justice rules that “cross-dressing in a public place is an offense only if it is done for an improper purpose.” The Guyana trans community and their allies argue that this is not enough. What is an “improper purpose?”

The Zapatistas haven’t made news in a while, but they are still making community away from mainstream norms. To read why many argue that the Zapatistas are feminist, click

How you can support the domestic workers movement

Domestic work is gendered and waaay undervalued. This we know. We know this because it’s been established over and over again on feminist blogs and in academia. But more importantly we know this because so many of us have seen it happen before our very eyes. We’ve watched our mothers cook and clean each day after working at her full time job, while Dad watches TV. We’ve seen this happen to our sisters, our friends, maybe it’s even happened to you. So many women aren’t properly compensated for that “second shift” they take on, and this extends to women who do domestic work professionally.

The profile of the average domestic worker tends to be a low-income, migrant woman of ...

Domestic work is gendered and waaay undervalued. This we know. We know this because it’s been established over and over again on feminist blogs and in academia. But more importantly we know this because so ...

We already lost Savita in Ireland. Don’t let Beatriz die in El Salvador.

Ed. note: This is a guest post by Juliana Britto Schwartz. By day, Juliana is a student at University of California, Santa Cruz. By night, she is a Latina feminist blogger at Julianabritto.com, where she writes about reproductive health justice, immigration, and feminist movements in Latin America.

You all remember Savita Halappanavar, right? Well, the world is looking at another Savita right now, and the only thing standing between her and life is a group of Salvadoran politicians.

Savita Halappanavar was a pregnant woman living in Ireland who was denied a life-saving abortion because her doctors could still detect a fetal heartbeat and were therefore required by law not to terminate the pregnancy. She died of blood poisoning while her husband watched.

“Beatriz” is ...

Ed. note: This is a guest post by Juliana Britto Schwartz. By day, Juliana is a student at University of California, Santa Cruz. By night, she is a Latina feminist blogger at Julianabritto.com, where she writes about reproductive health ...

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“The war on drugs has become a war on women”

Jody Williams and Rigoberta Menchu. Pic via CNN.

Violence against women in Latin America is on the rise–and it’s partly thanks to the US’s ineffective drug policies. A delegation of women, led by Nobel Laureates Jody Williams and Rigoberta Menchu, released a report yesterday on the horrifying levels of gender-based violence in Mexico, Honduras, and Guatemala.

Over the past decade, there’s been a 257 percent increase in femicide in Honduras, a 40 percent increase in Mexico, and a more than 30 percent increase in Guatemala. And in the last couple years, 24 women human rights defenders have been assassinated in those countries. (Recall Agnes Torres Sulca’s murder just a couple months ago.)

The violence is being perpetrated by both ...

Jody Williams and Rigoberta Menchu. Pic via CNN.

Violence against women in Latin America is on the rise–and it’s partly thanks to the US’s ineffective drug policies. A delegation of women, led by Nobel Laureates Jody ...

Videos from the non-violent war against the violent drug wars

Prostitutes and secret service and Latin America, oh my. This year’s Summit of the Americas was reduced to a scandal about secret service agents too dumb or too cheap to pay the money they owed the sex workers they solicited in Cartagena.

But the real story is that Latin American leaders are coming out of the woodwork and stating that the war on drugs is not working. These leaders are calling for reforms ranging from legalization, to decriminalization, to focusing of treatment instead of incarceration. And what’s shocking is that they are not just the lefty leaders who have come to power on Latin America’s so-called Pink Tide.

In addition to the left wing presidents in Bolivia, Argentina, and Brazil, to name ...

Prostitutes and secret service and Latin America, oh my. This year’s Summit of the Americas was reduced to a scandal about secret service agents too dumb or too cheap to pay the money they owed the sex ...

The Feministing Five: Natalia García Pasmanick

Natalia García Pasmanick, aka Favi, is a San Francisco-based vocalist, musician, rapper, performance artist, and visual artist. Raised in a musical family, she grew up singing Latin American and Iberian traditional music like guaguanco or tonada carvajal as well as being classically trained at San Francisco Girls’ Chorus.

A mujer descendant of campesinas living in diaspora, she uses art as a way to voice her experience of multiple belonging. Through her art, singing and mixed-race identity, Favi passes between multiple spaces and makes music influenced by these experiences, moving between different genres and elements of music. Although she doesn’t call herself a political artist, she is guided by the belief that all art stems from a political ...

Natalia García Pasmanick, aka Favi, is a San Francisco-based vocalist, musician, rapper, performance artist, and visual artist. Raised in a musical family, she grew up singing Latin American and Iberian traditional music like ...

Quick Hit: Latin America Ahead of U.S. on Same-Sex Marriage

Amidst all the hateful hype surrounding Prop 8 in CA, it can be easy to lose perspective on the same sex marriage “debate” and forget that it’s actually quite a straightforward issue, a matter of common sense and a basic human right. An opinion piece in today’s LA Times gives us a much-needed reminder of this, providing some perspective with the bold headline “Latin America ahead of U.S. on same-sex marriage.”

The article is definitely worth a read. It points out that countries like Mexico and Argentina have been able to recognize “that religion and civil law have different roles to perform in marriage, something absent in the debate in the U.S.” and highlights some of the most ...

Amidst all the hateful hype surrounding Prop 8 in CA, it can be easy to lose perspective on the same sex marriage “debate” and forget that it’s actually quite a straightforward issue, a matter of common sense ...

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