Posts Tagged International

Global Dispatch: Ireland’s March for Choice

Ed. note: This is a guest post from Grace Wilentz. Grace is a feminist activist and writer based in Dublin, Ireland. She is also a member of the South-based feminist alliance RESURJ: Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice. View previous  coverage of Savita Halappanavar and abortion in Ireland here and here

The sound of rolling suitcases rumbled from Dublin’s main thoroughfare to the Parliament as abortion rights activists took to the streets in Ireland’s third annual March for Choice on Saturday.

Estimates of the turnout are as high as 5000, more than double last year’s numbers. Having been an activist in this movement for a while- long enough to remember when we got excited about 40 people showing up to a demonstration- it ...

Ed. note: This is a guest post from Grace Wilentz. Grace is a feminist activist and writer based in Dublin, Ireland. She is also a member of the South-based feminist alliance RESURJ: Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice. View ...

The Feministing Five: Mallika Dutt

Global activist Mallika Dutt is passionately committed to ending violence against women and girls. As she sees it, “Gender violence against women is a human rights issue and it’s the biggest human rights pandemic on this planet. Bar none.  It is imperative that everyone understands their role and place in doing something.”

Since founding Breakthrough, a human rights organization that seeks to end global violence against women and girls, Mallika has been a pioneer on how to use media to spark worldwide change. Breakthrough’s viral videos such as the Bell Bajao and “Be That Guy” campaigns give viewers inspiration on how to take action in their communities. Her organization reaches both the United States and India, implementing a “global ...

Global activist Mallika Dutt is passionately committed to ending violence against women and girls. As she sees it, “Gender violence against women is a human rights issue and it’s the biggest human rights pandemic on this planet. ...

The Savita Effect? How abortion policies really get liberalized

Ed. note: This is a guest post from Grace Wilentz. Grace is a feminist activist and writer based in Dublin, Ireland. She is also a member of the South-based feminist alliance RESURJ: Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice. View previous  coverage of Savita Halappanavar and abortion in Ireland here

At the start of this year, a new law went into effect in Ireland, signaling a small but significant change for access to safe abortion services in Ireland. Before introduction of the law, Ireland had no practicable framework for accessing safe and legal abortions, making these services virtually unobtainable. Introduction of the law was widely reported, particularly in international media, as a reaction by the government to ...

Ed. note: This is a guest post from Grace Wilentz. Grace is a feminist activist and writer based in Dublin, Ireland. She is also a member of the South-based feminist alliance RESURJ: Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice. View ...

The Feministing Five: Lovisa Stannow

 The next time you are looking forward a wonder woman, look no further than Lovoisa Stannow. An established activist and current executive director of Just Detention International, she upholds an extraordinarily difficult yet vital mission — to help end sexual abuse in prisons. In her words, “its the idea that no one should suffer from sexual abuse, regardless of what they have done. We have to remember that every prisoner is a human being.” Caught at the intersection of the anti-violence and anti-prison movements, Lovoisa Stannow and her organization  provide resources to support inmates who survived violence  across the world.

And now, without further ado, the Feministing Five with Lovoisa Stannow.

 The next time you are looking forward a wonder woman, look no further than Lovoisa Stannow. An established activist and current executive director of Just Detention International, she upholds an extraordinarily difficult yet vital ...

Guest post: What motivated the raids on sex workers in Soho?

Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Mitzi Poesener. Mitzi Poesener is the pseudonym of a British sex worker, writer, and activist, living and working in London.

It’s been six days since the raids on sex workers in Soho, and there is still rampant speculation about the real motives behind the actions. The operation (code named Demontere) was the result of 18 months worth of investigations, and involved 200 officers in riot vans supported by sniffer dogs and a helicopter.

It has been reported that this is Westminster council’s biggest operation in years. For such a large operation it is interesting to note that only 22 people have been arrested. Other sex workers have been sent, without charges, to ...

Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Mitzi Poesener. Mitzi Poesener is the pseudonym of a British sex worker, writer, and activist, living and working in London.

It’s been six days since the raids on ...

Not Oprah’s Book Club: Do Muslim Women Need Saving?

Do Muslim women need saving? Lila Abu-Lughod’s question challenges what has become, in her words, the “new common sense”: a “moral mainstreaming of global women’s rights” that urges Westerners to intervene on behalf of faraway women held hostage by “backwards” religious beliefs. As feminists, we might see reason to celebrate a global, energized focus on gender. But Abu-Lughod argues persuasively that we have to approach these appeals with caution. Her analysis upsets not only wrong-headed ideas about the “Muslim women” we seek to save, but also fantasies of freedom and consent that form the basis of Western feminism.

Do Muslim women need saving? Lila Abu-Lughod’s question challenges what has become, in her words, the “new common sense”: a “moral mainstreaming of global women’s rights” that urges Westerners to intervene on behalf of faraway women ...

New study: Australians are increasingly intolerant

Especially towards Muslims, or people they believe to be Muslims. According to a new study from Monash University, the number of people with “negative views toward cultural diversity” is on the rise, and could be as high as 40% of the populace. Unsurprisingly, more than 40% of recent immigrants from Asia and South Asia report experiencing racial or religious discrimination in Australia. 

Especially towards Muslims, or people they believe to be Muslims. According to a new study from Monash University, the number of people with “negative views toward cultural diversity” is on the rise, and could be as ...

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