Posts Tagged indigenous

An indigenous woman wearing red clothing and a felt hat flips off the camera. Image reads: "The 12th of October is nothing to celebrate!"

Indigenous Peoples’ Day is over. Now what?

Well, Indigenous Peoples’ Day — what some still think is Columbus Day — has come and gone. After a day of celebrating indigenous resistance across the Americas, what’s an activist to do with their holiday hangover?

Keep learning! Let’s take this year’s Indigenous People’s Day as a kick in the pants to stay educated about the existence, resistance, and resilience of those who occupied this land long before any confused white dudes landed here thinking they had made it to India. 

Well, Indigenous Peoples’ Day — what some still think is Columbus Day — has come and gone. After a day of celebrating indigenous resistance across the Americas, what’s an activist to do with their holiday hangover?

Keep learning! ...

Feministing Jamz: What Las Cafeteras’ “This Land” says about land & power

Last week I wrote about a little yoga studio challenging big things in East LA. People’s Yoga might seem like a simple spot for some fun exercise, but with each class it offers, it challenges deeply entrenched systems of white supremacy and economic inequities.

This week People’s Yoga co-founder Leah Gallego’s band, Las Cafeteras, is doing the same thing with its latest music video, released just in time for Independence Day in the U.S. As profiled in last week’s post, Las Cafeteras is a band “who is looking for love and fighting for justice in the concrete jungle of Los Angeles,” so this video comes as no surprise.

Transcript available in the Youtube description.

Last week I wrote about a little yoga studio challenging big things in East LA. People’s Yoga might seem like a simple spot for some fun exercise, but with each class it offers, it challenges deeply entrenched ...

Mexican indigenous woman who was separated from baby allowed to pursue lawsuit against Mississippi welfare agency

In the past few weeks, stories coming from Oaxaca Mexico have reminded us just how limited and threatened the reproductive rights of indigenous Mexican women are. Local Oaxacans have been using social media to document the repeated cases of indigenous women denied care at local maternal clinics and being forced to give birth in waiting rooms, clinic steps, or lawns.

At the same time, we are reminded of how oppressions can cross borders. Earlier this month, news arrived that Cirila Balthazar Cruz, the indigenous woman in Mississippi who was separated from her baby daughter will be allowed to proceed with her lawsuit against the state’s welfare agency.

In the past few weeks, stories coming from Oaxaca Mexico have reminded us just how limited and threatened the reproductive rights of indigenous Mexican women are. Local Oaxacans have been using social media to document the repeated ...

No reproductive justice for pregnant indigenous women in Mexico

In October of last year, Irma Lopez Aurelio arrived at a state health clinic in Oaxaca, Mexico, in labor with her third child. The doctors at the clinic told her to come back, that her labor was not advanced enough and no doctor was available to help her. Irma, who is Indigenous, spoke little Spanish and was unable to communicate how advanced her labor was to the monolingual doctors. After hours of waiting, Irma gave birth on the lawn outside of the clinic.

In the past nine months, seven Indigenous women in Mexico have been documented having their babies in the yard, waiting rooms, or front steps of state clinics.

In October of last year, Irma Lopez Aurelio arrived at a state health clinic in Oaxaca, Mexico, in labor with her third child. The doctors at the clinic told her to come back, that her labor was not ...

This week in feminism south of the border

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A few of the pieces I’ve been reading on what feminists have been up to this week just south of the border:

Be sure to check out Red for Gender’s wonderful blog carnival, #dearcaribbean, with love  The series has covered topics ranging from victim-blaming to dictatorship, with writers from all around the Caribbean and its diaspora, and it’s still going!

Is pacification increasing violence against women in Rio’s favelas?

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A few of the pieces I’ve been reading on what feminists have been up to this week just south of the border:

Be sure to check out Red for ...

Latinas Feministas: Lorena Cabnal

Continuing our series of posts on Latina feminist resources and activists, today we’re featuring an interview with Lorena Cabnal. Lorena is an indigenous Xinka woman living in Guatemala. She is a self described community feminist, and the co-founder of the Association of Indigenous Women of Santa María Xalapán. She recently returned from a speaking tour with the Guatemalan Human Rights Commission, during which she addressed her community’s efforts to pushback against the mining industry in Guatemala.

Continuing our series of posts on Latina feminist resources and activists, today we’re featuring an interview with Lorena Cabnal. Lorena is an indigenous Xinka woman living in Guatemala. She is a self described community feminist, and the ...

Quick Hit: Massive Indigenous Rights Movement Launches Across Brazil

Last week, indigenous activists and allies took to the streets of Brazil’s major cities calling for recognition of the rights they are guaranteed within the country’s 1988 Constitution. This is one of the largest examples of indigenous mobilization the country has seen in recent years, though grassroots efforts have gained widespread attention as Brazil enters the global spotlight.

According to Upside Down World:

Hundreds of planned laws and constitutional amendments targeting the rights of indigenous and traditional communities are under debate in Brazil’s Congress and risk being passed this month before lawmakers go into recess, making this week’s mobilizations both urgent and timely.

“We are here because Congress wants to take our rights and extinguish our people,” said Chief Raoni ...

Last week, indigenous activists and allies took to the streets of Brazil’s major cities calling for recognition of the rights they are guaranteed within the country’s 1988 Constitution. This is one of the largest examples of ...

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