Posts Tagged History

The Feministing Five: Hanne Blank

Hanne Blank is a historian and author of several books including Virgin: The Untouched History, Unruly Appetites and the forthcoming Straight: The Surprisingly Short History of Heterosexuality. Virgin, which came out a few years ago, is one of the most thoroughly-researched and readable books about sex, culture and history that you’ll ever find, and I highly recommend you pick up a copy. Straight will be out in February 2012 and I suspect it will be just as rigorous and equally riveting.

Blank is also the author of Big Big Love: A Sourcebook on Sex and Relationships for People of Size and Those Who Love Them. This book flies in the face of the idea that sex is only for ...

Hanne Blank is a historian and author of several books including Virgin: The Untouched History, Unruly Appetites and the forthcoming Straight: The Surprisingly Short History of Heterosexuality. Virgin, which came out a few years ago, is ...

Quick hit: the role of Black women activists in the Civil War

There’s no better way to start the week than with some hardcore history nerdporn. So it’ a good thing that the Disunion blog at the New York Times, which chronicling the Civil War as it happened 150 years ago, is has posted a really interesting article on the role of Black women activists in the abolition movement:

Boston and Philadelphia black women benefited from the unparalleled influence in their cities of white abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, who championed both the emancipation of slaves and the rights of women. In Boston, the New England Anti-Slavery Society, which Garrison helped found in 1833, welcomed black women like Susan Paul. When white women in Boston established the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society without ...

There’s no better way to start the week than with some hardcore history nerdporn. So it’ a good thing that the Disunion blog at the New York Times, which chronicling the Civil War as it happened ...

Quick hit: Carl Sagan on why excluding women is a bad idea

From Letters of Note comes this missive on why excluding women from scientific organizations benefits no one, written by scientist Carl Sagan in 1981. Sagan was a member of The Explorers Club, an international society devoted to scientific exploration. Founded in 1904, the club still had not begun admitting women by the 1980s. Sagan penned a letter to the membership arguing that excluding women was not in the club’s interest, even if it was a tradition:

When our organization was formed in 1905, men were preventing women from voting and from pursuing many occupations for which they are clearly suited. In the popular mind, exploration was not what women did. Even so, women had played a significant but unheralded role ...

From Letters of Note comes this missive on why excluding women from scientific organizations benefits no one, written by scientist Carl Sagan in 1981. Sagan was a member of The Explorers Club, an international society devoted ...

Breaking: Mubarak ‘most likely’ to step down tonight.

UPDATE: Mubarak is not stepping down as of yet. Clearly, he didn’t get the hint.

According to several news sources, Hosni Mubarak may be stepping down tonight. The AP reports the military has made a national announcement that they are “stepping in to “safeguard the country,” and assured protesters that President Hosni Mubarak will meet their demands in the strongest indication yet that the longtime leader has lost power.”

Also, via NBC

Following an all-day meeting of the country’s supreme military council, state television reported that the military council had expressed its “support of the legitimate demands” of the people.

NBC News reported that a high-ranking source inside the president’s office said Mubarak would step down and the newly appointed vice president, Omar ...

UPDATE: Mubarak is not stepping down as of yet. Clearly, he didn’t get the hint.

According to several news sources, Hosni Mubarak may be stepping down tonight. The AP reports the military has made a national announcement ...

Not Oprah’s Book Club: A Strange Stirring

A book about a book. It’s a funny concept, but one that actually works quite powerfully in Stephanie Coontz’s new A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s. Coontz, the much-celebrated author of Marriage: A History, looks at the effect that Betty Friedan’s notorious tome had on a generation of women.

Coontz isn’t an evangelist for Friedan, which makes her a very trustworthy guide back in time to look at the indispensible ways in which The Feminine Mystique really did change so many women’s lives and so much of our cultural expectations about marriage, work, and fulfillment, and the ways in which its effect has sometimes been overstated. Did Betty Friedan literally ...

A book about a book. It’s a funny concept, but one that actually works quite powerfully in Stephanie Coontz’s new A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s. ...

Michele Bachman, “The US was founded on diversity.”

Michele Bachman proves to us that you don’t need to know a lot about American history to work in the American government. She typifies the “fake it till you make it,” ethos of young professionals, except when she fakes it she gets it all wrong, making you wonder if she really just believes the things she says. At a meeting in Iowa on tax relief Bachman went into why she loves the United States so damn much saying,

“How unique in all of the world, that one nation that was the resting point from people groups all across the world. It didn’t matter the color of their skin, it didn’t matter their language, it didn’t matter their economic status. Once you got ...

Michele Bachman proves to us that you don’t need to know a lot about American history to work in the American government. She typifies the “fake it till you make it,” ethos of young professionals, except when ...

Geraldine Doyle, inspiration for ‘We Can Do It’ poster, dies

Geraldine Doyle, the woman believed to be the inspiration for the ‘We Can Do It’ poster, passed away last Thursday at the age of 86.

Geraldine was working in a factory as a metal presser during World War II. The woman in the poster is now commonly assumed to be Rosie the Riveter (a symbol of female factory workers during the World Wars), although that was not the intent of the original designer.

The poster was embraced by the US feminist movement in the 1980s and remains an iconic symbol of our movement.

Geraldine Doyle, the woman believed to be the inspiration for the ‘We Can Do It’ poster, passed away last Thursday at the age of 86.

Geraldine was working in a factory as a metal presser ...

Remembering Ella Baker.

Today is the 24th anniversary of the passing of Ella Baker. Baker was a behind the scenes organizer in the civil rights movement who worked for almost 50 years in the field of justice mentoring some of the most widely known civil rights activists of our time. The Ella Baker Center mentions in their reason to name their organization after her was to honor the legacy of an “unsung hero.” Her work focused on building the power of leaders, some of the most important and overlooked work in activism. Take a minute today to honor her memory and read about her work and the amazing work of the Ella Baker Center.

Today is the 24th anniversary of the passing of Ella Baker. Baker was a behind the scenes organizer in the civil rights movement who worked for almost 50 years in the field of justice mentoring ...

Load More