Posts Tagged History

Map of the Day: The states that granted women’s suffrage before it was cool

The Washington Post points us to this old map that was distributed at a congressional hearing on women’s suffrage on March 3, 1914. The states in red are the ones that had already given women (which often meant white women) the right to vote. Those mostly western states gave the burgeoning suffrage movement an edge up. Since women were already able to vote in some states, proponents could ask the lawmakers if they really wanted “to put your party in the delicate position of going to four million women voters next fall” after failing to address suffrage.

And it turns out that these states have continued their tradition of embracing women in politics. Drawing on data from the Center for American Woman and Politics, 

The Washington Post points us to this old map that was distributed at a congressional hearing on women’s suffrage on March 3, 1914. The states in red are the ones that had already given women (which often ...

Quick Hit: Why I Visit Sites of Slavery

When Ani DiFranco decided to host a creative retreat at the Nottoway Plantation, she clearly didn’t think about what kind of statement she was making.

It is evident that she did not stop to consider how hosting a retreat at a plantation that at one point enslaved 150 humans helps to reinforce our historical amnesia and romanticization when it comes to the brutality that was slavery. Many bloggers quickly explained just what was so messed up about the whole debacle, which made me feel a bit better, but also left me feeling slightly unsettled. Where is the line between indulging in rosy-colored stories of happy slaves and remembering the suffering that our nation was built upon? Can we ...

When Ani DiFranco decided to host a creative retreat at the Nottoway Plantation, she clearly didn’t think about what kind of statement she was making.

It is evident that she did not stop to consider ...

Britain posthumously pardons scientist it chemically castrated

Alan Turing was a genius, a brilliant mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and considered the father of computer science and artificial intelligence. He helped crack the Enigma Code used by Nazis and, many historians argue, is responsible for shortening World War Two by two years, saving countless lives and ensuring victory for the Allies. So, why was this man, who should have been hailed as a hero, disgraced and sentenced to chemical castration? 

Alan Turing was a genius, a brilliant mathematician, logician, cryptanalyst, and considered the father of computer science and artificial intelligence. He helped crack the Enigma Code used by Nazis and, many historians argue, is responsible for ...

Daily Feminist Cheat Sheet

By Katie and Alexandra

 

Dear Republicans: it’s pretty simple. If you want to help the economy, you will support immigration reform and not shutting down the government. Get it?

Saudi activists to launch a national “drive-in” encouraging women to break the country’s ban on driving while female. 

Some good, old-fashioned rape encouragement!

A short documentary on police violence against trans people.

By Katie and Alexandra

 

Dear Republicans: it’s pretty simple. If you want to help the economy, you will support immigration reform and not shutting down the government. Get it?

Saudi activists to launch a ...

Daisy Bates was a boss

Tomorrow marks the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. As Katie noted yesterday, there are quite a few details that are omitted in the retelling of this landmark, cultural, social, political shift of an event to our generation and younger. A significant omission is the erasure of Daisy Bates, the only female organizer who spoke on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. As head of the NAACP in Arkansas, Bates led the effort to desegregate Little Rock’s Central High School in 1957.

Check out this trailer, below, from a feature length documentary on Bates.

The role of African American women in the civil ...

Tomorrow marks the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. As Katie noted yesterday, there are quite a few details that are omitted in the retelling of this landmark, ...

Justice for sexual violence during the Civil War

*Trigger warning*

Could it be the greatest irony in our history is that our nation actively prosecuted perpetrators of rape and sexual violence during the Civil War? In 1863, President Lincoln signed an executive order known as the Lieber Codes that governed Union soldiers and protected civilian women. Historian Crystal Feimster writes in the New York Times:

Union military courts prosecuted at least 450 cases involving sexual crimes. In North Carolina during the spring of 1865, Pvt. James Preble “did by physical force and violence commit rape upon the person of one Miss Letitia Craft.” When Perry Holland of the 1st Missouri Infantry confessed to the rape of Julia Anderson, a white woman in Tennessee, he was sentenced to be shot, ...

*Trigger warning*

Could it be the greatest irony in our history is that our nation actively prosecuted perpetrators of rape and sexual violence during the Civil War? In 1863, President Lincoln signed an executive order known as the ...

What can we do about feminism’s brand problem?

According to a new study at the Huffington Post (with YouGov) there is a major disparity between people that believe in equality “between the sexes” and identify as feminist. The study found that only 20% of Americans identify as feminist whereas 82% believe that “men and women should be social, political, and economic equals.” Equality between men and women is the most commonly accepted, mainstream definition of feminism. It’s not the only one — and certainly not the one that we adhere to at Feministing (as it relies too wholeheartedly on the gender binary and ignores all the other forms of difference we think are as important as gender oppression) — but it is what most people ...

According to a new study at the Huffington Post (with YouGov) there is a major disparity between people that believe in equality “between the sexes” and identify as feminist. The study found that only ...

Throwback Thursday: The audacity of Phyllis Wheatley as observed by June Jordan

We live in strange times. Yesterday, as Zerlina has discussed, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments over Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. And while Scalia barked that VRA is the “perpetuation of racial entitlement,” less than half a mile away, the Rosa Parks Statue was unveiled at the Capital Building in honor of Park’s activism that ignited the Civil Rights Movement. The same building that was built by African slaves. Yesterday was also the 71st anniversary of the Supreme Court’s upholding the 19th amendment that protected the right to vote for women. What a strange and poetic irony of a day was February 27, 2013; a normal day in American life, proof of our complicate history ...

We live in strange times. Yesterday, as Zerlina has discussed, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments over Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. And while Scalia barked that VRA is the “perpetuation of racial entitlement,” ...

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