Posts Tagged Hip Hop

More thoughts on Mister Cee, sexuality, and hip hop culture

I’m still thinking about DJ Mister Cee. He recently did a PSA in which he speaks openly (and more confidently) about his sexuality and decision to share his journey publicly. In it, he says:

The decision I made this week to open up about my sexuality has definitely been the most difficult thing that I have ever had to do in my life. But I felt like this was the time for me to do it personally and professionally. For me, I felt worried about how my family would be affected, how my coworkers and my friends and even my fans would be affected by this decision because in this hip-hop community of ours, it’s not ...

I’m still thinking about DJ Mister Cee. He recently did a PSA in which he speaks openly (and more confidently) about his sexuality and decision to share his journey publicly. In it, ...

Weekly Feminist Reader

50 years ago, today.

The stigma of loving transgender women.

“When people say women of color, am I included in that equation?”

Urban Outfitters #fail.

This is exceptionalism we don’t need.

One classroom, two genders.

Hollywood’s “sassy black lady” problem.

What Scandal gets right, and wrong.

9/11 and communities of color.

Aziz Ansari, Boom.

There’s no politician quite like her.

Mister Cee, hip-hop and tolerance.

What people don’t realize is that most of these girls are adolescents.”

#4immigrantwomen

New fave Tumblr: Men Taking Up Too Much Space On The Train

Making isn’t frivolous.

On getting called out.

Miss America, what’s the verdict?

Debunking ...

50 years ago, today.

The stigma of loving transgender women.

“When people say women of color, am I included in that equation?”

Urban Outfitters #fail.

This is exceptionalism we don’t need.

Watch now: Mychal talking about DJ Mister Cee

Don’t miss our own Mychal on HuffPost Live in a few a minutes discussing the DJ Mister Cee “scandal” with Feministing favorites Laverne Cox, Janet Mock, and Mark Anthony Neal. For background, read Janet’s excellent piece on the subject first.

Don’t miss our own Mychal on HuffPost Live in a few a minutes discussing the DJ Mister Cee “scandal” with Feministing favorites Laverne Cox, Janet Mock, and Mark Anthony Neal. For background, ...

Marriage equality’s hip hop theme song

The rap duo Macklemore and Ryan Lewis has broken records with their hits “Thrift Shop” and “Can’t Hold Us.” And now, with their pro-marriage equality hit “Same Love,” which features out lesbian Mary Lambert, they’re shattering stereotypes.

Just as “Same Love” supported this movement, the recent Supreme Court rulings on DOMA and Prop 8 are helping the song become an even greater hit. The song hit the charts in February, when several states were voting on marriage equality and the Supreme Court was considering challenges to DOMA and Prop 8. Wednesday, when the Supreme Court ruled on  both cases, “Same Love” rose to No. 28 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, up from No. ...

The rap duo Macklemore and Ryan Lewis has broken records with their hits “Thrift Shop” and “Can’t Hold Us.” And now, with their pro-marriage equality hit “Same Love,” which features out lesbian Mary Lambert, they’re ...

Money talks: Rick Ross releases full apology for rape lyric

So understand this– there’s no more talking to those who perpetuate or enable rape culture. There is only us talking to your money.

— dream hampton (@dreamhampton) April 11, 2013

When we first broke the story about Reebok dropping Rick Ross I had mixed emotions.  I was excited that rape culture was being talked about and taken seriously. I thought that Reebok’s statement about why they chose to drop him was extremely on point. I’ve appreciated that their motives were not aimed at the lyrics themselves, but his refusal to take the issue seriously as reflected in the initial half assed apology. (He has since released a full apology, which can be found here, and is appreciated.)

But ...

So understand this– there’s no more talking to those who perpetuate or enable rape culture. There is only us talking to your money.

— dream hampton (@dreamhampton) April 11, 2013

When we first broke the story about

Breaking: Reebok dumps Rick Ross for date rape lyrics

Rick Ross has reportedly been dumped by Reebok due to lyrics promoting date rape in his recent single “U.O.E.N.O”. The lyrics in question were “Put Molly all in her champagne, she ain’t even know it. I took her home and I enjoyed that, she ain’t even know it.” The verse has since been replaced on the song. Reebok reportedly cited Ross’ inadequate response as well as the lyrics themselves when discussing their decision. The move comes after almost a week of pressure from women’s rights groups and a widely circulated online petition. TMZ reports:

Reebok tells TMZ … “Reebok holds our partners to a high standard, and we ...

Rick Ross has reportedly been dumped by Reebok due to lyrics promoting date rape in his recent single “U.O.E.N.O”. The lyrics in question were “Put Molly all in her champagne, she ain’t even know it. I ...

Can an Asian woman be taken seriously in rap?

Answer: This is a stupid question.

New York magazine’s profile of Nora Lum, aka Awkwafina, details the Korean-Chinese-American rapper’s rise from her hilarious “My Vag” track last year to the harder “NYC Bitche$,” which was released in March. The article’s headline asks: “Can an Asian Woman Be Taken Seriously in Rap?”

The piece dabbles in gender identity politics in hip hop. Can women rap? Well, sure. Will it be hard? Duh. Lum says:

“If women dabble in rap but they’re not rappers, to get from dabbling to doing it is really difficult, confidence-wise. There’s a degree of having to prove yourself, also, and that’s really hard: I’m not trying to ruin your institution, I’m trying to ...

Answer: This is a stupid question.

New York magazine’s profile of Nora Lum, aka Awkwafina, details the Korean-Chinese-American rapper’s rise from her hilarious “My Vag” track last year to the harder “NYC ...

Don Draper

Rick Ross, Don Draper, and the fantasy world of masculinity

Ed. note: This is a guest post from Mychal Denzel Smith. He is a writer, social commentator, and mental health advocate whose work on politics, social justice, mental health, and black male identity has appeared in outlets such as The Nation, The Guardian, The Atlantic, Gawker, Salon, The Root, and more.

I’ve been thinking a lot about Rick Ross as of late, given all the controversy surrounding him and his disgusting, indefensible lyrics condoning rape (and his subsequent non-apology that was almost as bad as lyric that prompted it). In a way, I feel partially responsible, having been a fan of Ross’ music despite the overt misogyny, and I’ve ...

Ed. note: This is a guest post from Mychal Denzel Smith. He is a writer, social commentator, and mental health advocate whose work on politics, social justice, mental health, and black male identity has ...

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