Posts Tagged Hip Hop

Feministing Jamz: Listen to this awesome cover of Lorde’s “Royals”

If you remember, Vero’s post about the Grammy award-winning song “Royals” kinda blew up the Interwebs by pointing out the cognitive flaw in Lorde’s cultural critique of music, youth, and consumer culture.

Vero rightly pointed out something that didn’t sit well with me either. The concern I shared with Vero was that while the lyrics serve as a valid critique of the excessive consumerism in hip hop (and the entire music industry, really), for casual listeners, they run the danger of becoming just a racialized backhanded indictment. Lorde’s “Royals” definitely made me wince in places even though I kind of liked the song in a fairly meh music season of 2013 (before King Bey blew everything up and ...

If you remember, Vero’s post about the Grammy award-winning song “Royals” kinda blew up the Interwebs by pointing out the cognitive flaw in Lorde’s cultural critique of music, youth, and consumer culture.

Vero

It’s time for black men to stop building culture around the destruction of black women

Yesterday, I watched my friends Marc Lamont Hill and Brittney Cooper do this HuffPost Live segment entitled “Do ‘Hood Sites’ Normalize Black Stereotypes?” The conversation was mostly about the infamous WorldStarHipHop.com and their penchant for posting videos of black youth engaged in violence toward one another. These videos generate thousands upon thousands of hits, are circulated widely, and become entertainment for many. The discussion was about whether or not the distribution and popularity of these videos help to perpetuate stereotypes that are heaped onto blackness.

On that particular question, I think there’s a “yes, but…” These videos don’t help combat the stereotypes, but they would exist even without WorldStar. Getting rid of the video hosting site would not end the violence ...

Yesterday, I watched my friends Marc Lamont Hill and Brittney Cooper do this HuffPost Live segment entitled “Do ‘Hood Sites’ Normalize Black Stereotypes?” The conversation was mostly about the infamous WorldStarHipHop.com and their penchant for posting videos ...

Explicit Content: A brief intro to Trap Feminism

Among other things, I’ve identified as a hip hop feminist. The term does the job of expressing my engagement in a culture of commodified blackness. I’ve also talked here about how hood feminism resonated with me. But neither term truly speaks to my inner feminist hoochie; nor explains the complex, sex-positive, financially ambitious, and self-affirming components of my feminism. But through these lens, I’ve been able to identify other spaces that do. Trap music is one of them. It’s easy to get caught up in the problematic elements of drug dealing and violence in communities of color, themes that are prevalent in trap music, but there is more than meets the eye.

Among other things, I’ve identified as a hip hop feminist. The term does the job of expressing my engagement in a culture of commodified blackness. I’ve also talked here about how hood feminism resonated ...

Weekly Feminist Reader

What the tech industry has to do with the future of health.

We still don’t have a good way of talking about pursuing friendship.

The dangerous transphobia of Roald Dahl’s Matilda.

“When I fully burned off the anxiety inherited from my mother’s unlived life.”

How the rise of men’s rights activists are hurting women and men.

Everyone is tired of white people on TV.

How jock culture supports rape culture.

What the tech industry has to do with the future of health.

We still don’t have a good way of talking about pursuing friendship.

The dangerous transphobia of Roald Dahl’s Matilda.

“When I fully

Welcoming a new digital space: what “hood feminism” means to me

There is so much power in a pen (or a keyboard). Creating language to describe our lived experience is so transcending, turning abstract principles into discourse. I was reminded of this when I first heard about hood feminism. Blogger Jamie defines the parameters of her own existence and the ways in which she felt out of place in feminist spaces. She says:

“While Big Name Feminists are debating The End of Men, women on the margins–women like me–are sleeping at train stations and working double shifts for paltry wages. They are buying school supplies with rent money. They are fighting for citizenship because they aren’t the ‘right kind of immigrants.'”

This is reflective of the concerns that many women of ...

There is so much power in a pen (or a keyboard). Creating language to describe our lived experience is so transcending, turning abstract principles into discourse. I was reminded of this when I first heard about

More thoughts on Mister Cee, sexuality, and hip hop culture

I’m still thinking about DJ Mister Cee. He recently did a PSA in which he speaks openly (and more confidently) about his sexuality and decision to share his journey publicly. In it, he says:

The decision I made this week to open up about my sexuality has definitely been the most difficult thing that I have ever had to do in my life. But I felt like this was the time for me to do it personally and professionally. For me, I felt worried about how my family would be affected, how my coworkers and my friends and even my fans would be affected by this decision because in this hip-hop community of ours, it’s not ...

I’m still thinking about DJ Mister Cee. He recently did a PSA in which he speaks openly (and more confidently) about his sexuality and decision to share his journey publicly. In it, ...

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