Posts Tagged Hip Hop Feminism

Wow, that Lorde song Royals is racist

Have you heard this young lady, Lorde, on the radio? Yesterday the New York Times posted a review of her recent performance at Webster Hall, and I’m kind of at a loss about the way that her big hit, Royals, is being talked about there and elsewhere. Now I’m a music lover, but since the only radio stations I listen to are the local hip hop station and NPR, I hadn’t heard this one – which I hear has been making the rounds on pop stations for a minute –  until somewhat recently:

(Full transcript of lyrics at the end of post)

Folks who have spent some time with me know that I deeply love music videos, so when I saw ...

Have you heard this young lady, Lorde, on the radio? Yesterday the New York Times posted a review of her recent performance at Webster Hall, and I’m kind of at a loss about the way that ...

Welcoming a new digital space: what “hood feminism” means to me

There is so much power in a pen (or a keyboard). Creating language to describe our lived experience is so transcending, turning abstract principles into discourse. I was reminded of this when I first heard about hood feminism. Blogger Jamie defines the parameters of her own existence and the ways in which she felt out of place in feminist spaces. She says:

“While Big Name Feminists are debating The End of Men, women on the margins–women like me–are sleeping at train stations and working double shifts for paltry wages. They are buying school supplies with rent money. They are fighting for citizenship because they aren’t the ‘right kind of immigrants.'”

This is reflective of the concerns that many women of ...

There is so much power in a pen (or a keyboard). Creating language to describe our lived experience is so transcending, turning abstract principles into discourse. I was reminded of this when I first heard about

Ray J, I Hit It First

“I Hit It First”: The art of hoe shaming

I’ve finally stopped rolling my eyes hard enough to talk about Ray J and his new single “I Hit It First.” This (terrible) track is basically three minutes and 20 seconds of shade thrown at Kim Kardashian and Kanye West, based on the well-known fact that Ray J was Kim’s partner in the infamous sex tape that put her on the radar. Amidst Kim Kardashian’s ever growing fame, Ray J is here to remind us that he “hit it first,” and made her the person she is today.

*stifles laughter*

One of my favorite contemporary subjects is what I like to call “hoe politics.” It is the modern language, messages, dialogue, and critique spawned from the concept that there ...

I’ve finally stopped rolling my eyes hard enough to talk about Ray J and his new single “I Hit It First.” This (terrible) track is basically three minutes and 20 seconds of shade thrown ...

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