Posts Tagged Hip Hop Feminism

No Type: Trap Feminism Pt. 2

I’ve been thinking a lot about trap feminism and what it means since I first wrote about it in January. In this introductory piece — which was mostly a purge of initial ideas that I had been bouncing back and forth with friends — I identified some of the makings of trap feminism which included an acknowledgement of women as participants and contributors to hip hop and trap music, active agents over their sexuality and bodies, and conscious players in informal/non-institutional financial transactions. Reflecting back now, trap feminism can be applied much more broadly. Today I find myself thinking about trap feminism as a tool used to identify liberating themes in trap music and facets of it’s surrounding ...

I’ve been thinking a lot about trap feminism and what it means since I first wrote about it in January. In this introductory piece — which was mostly a purge of initial ideas that ...

Feministing Jamz: Junglepussy’s Satisfaction Guaranteed

If you’re not hip to Junglepussy yet, the time to get up to speed is right now. Unapologetically sexual, proudly black and West Indian, and with unmatched swag, Junglepussy has been releasing tracks here and there and making cameos in the videos of Feministing Jamz faves Dai Burger and Le1f. Now, she’s finally here with a debut album.

If you’re not hip to Junglepussy yet, the time to get up to speed is right now. Unapologetically sexual, proudly black and West Indian, and with unmatched swag, Junglepussy has been releasing tracks here and there ...

I love Outkast. I hate misogyny.

I love Outkast. Everyone should. I don’t trust people who don’t love Outkast. If you don’t love Outkast, stop reading this. You aren’t welcome here.

(I’m not really kidding!)

So I, like many others, was incredibly excited to find out that the duo of Andre 3000 and Big Boi would reunite this spring/summer, after not performing on stage together in 10 years, to play Coachella. I was highly disappointed that I’m too poor to be able to actually go to Coachella and see them, but modern technology is great in that huge events like this get livestreamed on the interwebs and then saved for posterity.

I watched. Not live, but the next day. I got excited. I danced ...

I love Outkast. Everyone should. I don’t trust people who don’t love Outkast. If you don’t love Outkast, stop reading this. You aren’t welcome here.

(I’m not really kidding!)

So I, like many others, ...

Feministing Jamz: Talking feminism with Ana Tijoux

Lee esta entrevista en español al final de esta página.

Ana Tijoux has been in the hip hop game for a long time, but I caught onto her as just about everyone else did, when she collaborated with Mexican singer Julieta Venegas back in 2007. I loved her work immediately. Though the themes of her solo albums have all been really different – from super introspective to super global – I continue to be impressed and surprised with her music. I was really excited about her new album, and having the chance to listen to it over the last few weeks, I can tell you that it does not disappoint. Ana brings back her sick rhymes and ...

Lee esta entrevista en español al final de esta página.

Ana Tijoux has been in the hip hop game for a long time, but I caught onto her as just about everyone else did, when she ...

Explicit Content: A brief intro to Trap Feminism

Among other things, I’ve identified as a hip hop feminist. The term does the job of expressing my engagement in a culture of commodified blackness. I’ve also talked here about how hood feminism resonated with me. But neither term truly speaks to my inner feminist hoochie; nor explains the complex, sex-positive, financially ambitious, and self-affirming components of my feminism. But through these lens, I’ve been able to identify other spaces that do. Trap music is one of them. It’s easy to get caught up in the problematic elements of drug dealing and violence in communities of color, themes that are prevalent in trap music, but there is more than meets the eye.

Among other things, I’ve identified as a hip hop feminist. The term does the job of expressing my engagement in a culture of commodified blackness. I’ve also talked here about how hood feminism resonated ...

A little more on Lorde, Royals, and Racism

So, my piece last week about Lorde’s song “Royals” being racist? BLEW. UP. Mostly I’ve received a barrage of personal attacks, but a few folks have asked genuine questions that are important to address.

First, it feels important (if obvious) to state that Feministing is a U.S.-based site and has a predominantly U.S.-based readership. Because that is the audience of this blog, it is the audience I believed would be reading my initial post. Clearly it has reached a much wider audience now, one that does not necessarily have a full understanding of the context from which I am writing. To be completely clear: my critique focuses on how the song lands in the United States.

Lorde’s Royals is ...

So, my piece last week about Lorde’s song “Royals” being racist? BLEW. UP. Mostly I’ve received a barrage of personal attacks, but a few folks have asked genuine questions that are important to address.

First, it ...

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