Posts Tagged guest post

Global Dispatch: Ireland’s March for Choice

Ed. note: This is a guest post from Grace Wilentz. Grace is a feminist activist and writer based in Dublin, Ireland. She is also a member of the South-based feminist alliance RESURJ: Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice. View previous  coverage of Savita Halappanavar and abortion in Ireland here and here

The sound of rolling suitcases rumbled from Dublin’s main thoroughfare to the Parliament as abortion rights activists took to the streets in Ireland’s third annual March for Choice on Saturday.

Estimates of the turnout are as high as 5000, more than double last year’s numbers. Having been an activist in this movement for a while- long enough to remember when we got excited about 40 people showing up to a demonstration- it ...

Ed. note: This is a guest post from Grace Wilentz. Grace is a feminist activist and writer based in Dublin, Ireland. She is also a member of the South-based feminist alliance RESURJ: Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice. View ...

The Savita Effect? How abortion policies really get liberalized

Ed. note: This is a guest post from Grace Wilentz. Grace is a feminist activist and writer based in Dublin, Ireland. She is also a member of the South-based feminist alliance RESURJ: Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice. View previous  coverage of Savita Halappanavar and abortion in Ireland here

At the start of this year, a new law went into effect in Ireland, signaling a small but significant change for access to safe abortion services in Ireland. Before introduction of the law, Ireland had no practicable framework for accessing safe and legal abortions, making these services virtually unobtainable. Introduction of the law was widely reported, particularly in international media, as a reaction by the government to ...

Ed. note: This is a guest post from Grace Wilentz. Grace is a feminist activist and writer based in Dublin, Ireland. She is also a member of the South-based feminist alliance RESURJ: Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice. View ...

Guest post: From obits to statues to traffic circles, whither the women?

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Soraya Chemaly. Soraya is a media critic and activist whose work focuses on women’s rights, free speech and the role of gender in politics, religion and popular culture.

Last week, irked after counting up The New York Time’s last 66 obits and finding that only seven were of women, poet Lynn Melnick tweeted the count, pointing out the imbalance to @NYTimesObituary. @NYTimesObituary, a parody account, responded with deadpan explanations, such as “After careful consideration, we believe that women have a tendency of dying less often.”  Their conversation continued the next morning, which is when I joined them, totally taken in, to ask how “notable,” and “significant” were defined. Despite repeating some ...

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Soraya Chemaly. Soraya is a media critic and activist whose work focuses on women’s rights, free speech and the role of gender in politics, religion and popular culture.

Last week, irked ...

How the Connecticut Department of Children & Families is failing a trans girl of color

Editor’s note: This is a guest contribution from Chase Strangio. Chase is a Staff Attorney with the LGBT & AIDS Project of the American Civil Liberties Union and the co-founder of the Lorena Borjas Community Fund.

Jessica* is a 16 year-old transgender girl. She has been in and out of the foster care and juvenile justice systems since early childhood, surviving unthinkable trauma and demonstrating resilience and strength. As a ward of the Department of Children and Families (DCF), DCF is her legal parent and guardian, responsible for her care and well-being. Jessica was also in the custody of the juvenile justice side of DCF following a delinquency adjudication; she has never been convicted of a crime or faced ...

Editor’s note: This is a guest contribution from Chase Strangio. Chase is a Staff Attorney with the LGBT & AIDS Project of the American Civil Liberties Union and the co-founder of the Lorena Borjas Community Fund. ...

Not Oprah’s Book Club: Out of Time: The Pleasures and the Perils of Ageing

At conferences, colloquia, open meetings, we’ve seen them: older, intent, perhaps a bit disappointed, perhaps exhausted from years of movement work of which we are not aware because we do not ask, but often eager, often a bit giddy, it seems, to be there, as if granted unexpected permission.  These, our feminist forebears, perhaps even expressing their gratitude for the intergenerational dialog that’s happened this evening—hear the implied finally. Or maybe they have been our teachers, our editors, or even (lucky us) our employers; too rarely are they our peers, our collaborators, our friends.

Wherever we meet them, as young feminists we don’t often do a good enough job of thanking them, of appreciating their work openly and earnestly without ...

At conferences, colloquia, open meetings, we’ve seen them: older, intent, perhaps a bit disappointed, perhaps exhausted from years of movement work of which we are not aware because we do not ask, but often eager, often ...

Guest post: What motivated the raids on sex workers in Soho?

Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Mitzi Poesener. Mitzi Poesener is the pseudonym of a British sex worker, writer, and activist, living and working in London.

It’s been six days since the raids on sex workers in Soho, and there is still rampant speculation about the real motives behind the actions. The operation (code named Demontere) was the result of 18 months worth of investigations, and involved 200 officers in riot vans supported by sniffer dogs and a helicopter.

It has been reported that this is Westminster council’s biggest operation in years. For such a large operation it is interesting to note that only 22 people have been arrested. Other sex workers have been sent, without charges, to ...

Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Mitzi Poesener. Mitzi Poesener is the pseudonym of a British sex worker, writer, and activist, living and working in London.

It’s been six days since the raids on ...

This Monday, stand with #TexasWomenForever

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from Alison Turkos, Co-Chair of the Board of the New York Abortion Access Fund. When she’s not breaking down barriers to abortion access she’s probably talking about how much she loves Vermont.

I fund abortions in New York and I do so proudly, but let the record show: I’ve never been to Texas. I’ve never spoken to a Texan who is unable to get an appointment at a clinic because of the wait or logistics, like travel. I’ve never had to tell someone that unfortunately I can’t fund their procedure because I’ve reached my budget for the week or that I can only pledge $150 towards their abortion when ...

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from Alison Turkos, Co-Chair of the Board of the New York Abortion Access Fund. When she’s not breaking down barriers to abortion access she’s probably ...

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