Posts Tagged foreign policy

Today is the 10th Anniversary of the Iraq War

Today marks 10 years since the U.S. began the invasion of Iraq.  We were lied into this war and countless innocent Iraqis and American troops lost their lives.  And even today, on the 10th anniversary, a wave of car bombs have killed 56 people in Iraq.

The Obama administration did successfully leave (except for contractors) as promised in the 2008 election and so now we look back on the war, the good, the bad and the ugly.

Via Think Progress:

Ten years after the first American bombs fell on Baghdad, the United States is still paying the costs for the invasion of Iraq — monetarily, strategically, psychologically and morally. The decision to launch the war is sure to be re-debatedad nauseum over ...

Today marks 10 years since the U.S. began the invasion of Iraq.  We were lied into this war and countless innocent Iraqis and American troops lost their lives.  And even today, on the 10th anniversary, a ...

Quick hit: The last presidential emcee battle

So the biggest fallout from the last presidential debate of 2012 might be the most awesome MC diss made by head of state to an opposing candidate. Followed by the best commander-in-chief mansplaining I’ve ever seen in the history of evers:

And the interenets responded with the kind of gumption and American ingenuity that I’d expect.

Perhaps Ann’s round up of responses best captures our collective reactions to the tit for tat between Romney and Obama in this last face off as we head into the final stretch of the forever presidential race.

So the biggest fallout from the last presidential debate of 2012 might be the most awesome MC diss made by head of state to an opposing candidate. Followed by the best commander-in-chief mansplaining I’ve ever seen in ...

A New Day in Politics: Complicated conversations about Muslim women’s rights

I have been heartened by the substantive conversation happening in thought leadership publications about the plight of women in predominantly Arab and Muslim nations. Referring to Muslim women as people with desires, agency, needs and destinies is a new direction in how “the West” has ever talked about the real lives of women within these cultural contexts. But despite this continued desire to have these conversations–larger narratives about Muslim women and their bodies and Western intervention still dictate how these conversations play out.

Much of this was spurred by Mona Eltahawy’s controversial piece in Foreign Policy linked in yesterday’s Weekly Feminist Reader that came out last week called “Why do they hate us?” Her argument is pretty provocative calling out the ...

I have been heartened by the substantive conversation happening in thought leadership publications about the plight of women in predominantly Arab and Muslim nations. Referring to Muslim women as people with desires, agency, needs and destinies is a new ...