Posts Tagged Economics

Women don’t forget to have children

Despite what New York Magazine might tell you, women don’t forget to have children. Women who don’t have children often choose to remain childless after careful consideration. According to this article in Stylist, a UK magazine, women in the United Kingdom are choosing “between motherhood and solvency.” It’s not just about education eating into prime conception years anymore; job insecurity, stagnating wages and the rising cost of living have made having children financially unwise for many women who always envisioned themselves having kids:

Of course, most women could have a baby – plenty do on far lesser salaries than ours – or even no wage at all. But it seems that’s not what we want. When we imagined becoming ...

Despite what New York Magazine might tell you, women don’t forget to have children. Women who don’t have children often choose to remain childless after careful consideration. According to this article in Stylist, a UK magazine, ...

Guest Post: Gender Neutral Financial Security

This is a guest post from Kimberly Palmer, author of the new book Generation Earn: The Young Professional’s Guide to Spending, Investing, and Giving Back, and personal finance columnist at US News & World Report.

When I first set out to write a personal finance book, I thought it would be for women. After all, I’ve always love writing about feminism, and I planned to incorporate that passion into my full-time job as a personal finance columnist for US News & World Report.

As I started my research, though, something didn’t seem quite right. There were tons of pink-covered books on the market aimed at women, much of which focused on how to spend less money and reign in shopaholic tendencies. ...

This is a guest post from Kimberly Palmer, author of the new book Generation Earn: The Young Professional’s Guide to Spending, Investing, and Giving Back, and personal finance columnist at US News & World Report.

When I ...

New study confirms that women give more money than men

When you hear the word “philanthropist,” what do you imagine? Probably a person sort of like this:

Isn’t that picture of Bill Gates amazingly silly? In fact, you would be more accurate to imagine a person like this:

Those are some women protesting with the Domestic Workers United. Here’s the deal: The Women’s Philanthropy Institute at the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University has just released a study that concludes that across nearly all income levels women are more likely to give and on average give more than men. Here some of the data breakdown by annual income level:

$23,509 or less-women are 28% more likely to give

When you hear the word “philanthropist,” what do you imagine? Probably a person sort of like this:

Isn’t that picture of Bill Gates amazingly silly? In fact, you would be more accurate to imagine ...

“I want to tell them that it’s okay to use contraception, but the Church says no.”

At Nicholas Kristof’s blog On the Ground, Amy Ernst writes about the connection between contraception, poverty, religion, women’s rights and health in Congo. Ernst is an American, and is in Congo working for an organization called COPERMA, which helps survivors of rape and war. In this post, she warns that while Congo’s HIV/AIDS rates are relatively low, they cannot stay thus when contraception remains largely unknown and unavailable.

The quote in the title of this post is from a Congolese Catholic priest, who admitted to Ernst that despite the Church’s teachings, he understands the desperate need for contraception in Congo. But because of the Church’s teachings, when women come to him asking for guidance on how to avoid having more ...

At Nicholas Kristof’s blog On the Ground, Amy Ernst writes about the connection between contraception, poverty, religion, women’s rights and health in Congo. Ernst is an American, and is in Congo working for an organization called ...

Not Oprah’s Book Club: Superconnect

It’s not often that I read business books, but sometimes it’s fun to dabble in the master’s tools for a moment. Superconnect: Harnessing the Power of Networks and the Strength of Weak Links is filled with examples of the ways in which relationships make the world go round. It’s a feminist kind of wisdom, really, but applied to a very patriarchal world: international business. (The two authors, Richard Koch and Greg Lockwood, made part of their fortune with an online gambling business for God’s sake.)

In any case, the thesis is pretty intuitive but there were a few interesting surprises. For example, while we all agree that strong links (family, close friends, a partner) are necessary to a healthy ...

It’s not often that I read business books, but sometimes it’s fun to dabble in the master’s tools for a moment. Superconnect: Harnessing the Power of Networks and the Strength of Weak Links is filled ...

The beating heart of the economy

Her Blueprint, the blog of the International Museum of Women, has a really interesting post, and related podcast, about economics and language. Feminist economist Nancy Folbre argues that the language–liquidity, evasion, and safety net, oh my–we’ve been using to describe our economy are, perhaps, part of why it’s been ailing so badly. Most dangerous are the metaphors we employ, which Her Blueprint points out are largely automotive in nature: “jump-starting the economy” or “economic engine.” These aren’t accurate, Folbre argues, and only serve to further dumb down an already financially less-than-savvy populace. Instead, she argues, let’s use metaphors that really propel us to create an economy that serves people:

The [new terminology] that I’ve suggested … is ...

Her Blueprint, the blog of the International Museum of Women, has a really interesting post, and related podcast, about economics and language. Feminist economist Nancy Folbre argues that the language–liquidity, evasion, and safety ...

Social justice philanthropy

The true measure of the wealthy should be their generosity, said Bradford Smith, president of the Foundation Center.

“If philanthropy is indeed becoming the new status symbol of the wealthy it will do a lot more to change the world than buying Gucci bags,” he said.

This is an excerpt from a recent Reuters article about the way in which philanthropy has become a new status symbol among the ultra-wealthy. On the one hand, it’s promising and true. Indeed, if more wealthy people were donating to Oxfam, that would have more of a social impact than were they to use this same amount of money on a shopping spree at Tiffany’s. It doesn’t matter what their motivation is as long as ...

The true measure of the wealthy should be their generosity, said Bradford Smith, president of the Foundation Center.

“If philanthropy is indeed becoming the new status symbol of the wealthy it will do a lot more to change ...

Social justice philanthropy

The true measure of the wealthy should be their generosity, said Bradford Smith, president of the Foundation Center.

“If philanthropy is indeed becoming the new status symbol of the wealthy it will do a lot more to change the world than buying Gucci bags,” he said.

This is an excerpt from a recent Reuters article about the way in which philanthropy has become a new status symbol among the ultra-wealthy. On the one hand, it’s promising and true. Indeed, if more wealthy people were donating to Oxfam, that would have more of a social impact than were they to use this same amount of money on a shopping spree at Tiffany’s. It doesn’t matter what their motivation is as long as ...

The true measure of the wealthy should be their generosity, said Bradford Smith, president of the Foundation Center.

“If philanthropy is indeed becoming the new status symbol of the wealthy it will do a lot more to change ...

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