Posts Tagged disability justice

Feministing Readz: Looking for home in ire’ne lara silva’s flesh to bone

I’m not sure about your social media, but mine lately’s been blowing up with people talking about just how much their hometown they are. People on my feeds are so Chicago. They’re so Wingate, NC, they’re so Worcester, MA, and they’re so New York City. They’re dropping names of old hangouts and neighborhood characters. As an immigrant girl, I happen to have thought quite a bit about home. But am I so my hometown? Nah. In fact, I’m so immigrant that when I go back to the place I’m from I’m a gringa, although here I’ll never really be American. I’m so immigrant that I feel the absence of so much knowledge about my home like an ache on a ...

I’m not sure about your social media, but mine lately’s been blowing up with people talking about just how much their hometown they are. People on my feeds are so Chicago. They’re so Wingate, NC, they’re ...

The Feministing Five: Riva Lehrer

Infusing her paintings with powerful activism, Riva Lehrer has explored such themes on the body, disability, and identity for over 20 years. She was born with spina bifida and has used her artwork to identify critical questions about bodies, creativity, and perspective. Her art has been featured in galleries and museums across the country, and Riva is also a writer and professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Her work frequently is composed of portrait series like “Totems + Familiars” which addresses the connection between imagination, survival, and metaphor as well as “Mirror Shards” which extends her use of visual metaphor to explore human’s reliance upon animal symbols to produce empathy. We’ve included some ...

Infusing her paintings with powerful activism, Riva Lehrer has explored such themes on the body, disability, and identity for over 20 years. She was born with spina bifida and has used her artwork ...

On autism, feminism, and human value

Of all the things I’ve learned from working alongside and reading the work of amazing disability justice activists, one of my biggest ah-hah moments was when they helped me make connections between the ways bodies are valued (or aren’t) and their ability to produce capital. It’s a very common trope, that of the good, “productive” person – with “productive” having very specific meanings under capitalism. This piece by Bridget Allen hits on those themes and particularly connects the ways some feminisms have been complicit in this narrative:

Of all the things I’ve learned from working alongside and reading the work of amazing disability justice activists, one of my biggest ah-hah moments was when they helped me make connections between the ways bodies are ...