Posts Tagged culture

Melissa Harris-Perry talks “War on Women” and Beyonce

I recently interviewed Professor Melissa Harris-Perry for Loop21.com and she dished on everything from intersectionality to Beyonce.  Melissa Harris-Perry‘s show (by the same name) has been such a breath of fresh air on the cable news landscape.  They’ve had a wide array of segments that will surely attract different swaths of viewing audiences.

It’s important for us to have her perspective as a woman of color and a feminist in the public conversation especially at a time when women’s rights and bodies are under assault.  #Nerdland (which is the hashtag for the show) is certainly a place where a variety of perspectives are welcome, challenged, and debated and this has allowed for a higher level of intellectual conversation than we ...

I recently interviewed Professor Melissa Harris-Perry for Loop21.com and she dished on everything from intersectionality to Beyonce.  Melissa Harris-Perry‘s show (by the same name) has been such a breath of fresh air on the cable news ...

Female genital cutting: a rite, a torture, or both?

In today’s Times, Nick Kristof writes about the dilemma presented by female genital cutting. The practice, which he calls “one of the most pervasive human rights abuses worldwide,” prompts a critical question: where is the line between ending human rights violations and cultural imperialism?

For four decades, Westerners have campaigned against genital cutting, without much effect. Indeed, the Western term “female genital mutilation” has antagonized some African women because it assumes that they have been “mutilated.” Aid groups are now moving to add the more neutral term “female genital cutting” to their lexicon.

Is it cultural imperialism for Westerners to oppose genital mutilation? Yes, perhaps, but it’s also justified. Some cultural practices such as genital mutilation — or foot-binding or bride-burning ...

In today’s Times, Nick Kristof writes about the dilemma presented by female genital cutting. The practice, which he calls “one of the most pervasive human rights abuses worldwide,” prompts a critical question: where is the line ...

Quick Hit: The economics of “Ladies drink free”

Ever wondered why it is that some night clubs charge women less for entry than they charge men, or let them drink for free? Is it because these establishments are aware of the gender pay gap and are trying to exercise a little after-hours affirmative action? Is it because they are deeply invested in the theory of gender analysis developed by Lauper in the late 1980s, i.e., that girls just want to have fun?

No. It is because they think that guys will pay for access to drunk girls. In other words, sexism! (Is it also sexist to charge men one rate and women another? Why yes, it is! Sexism hurts everyone!)

Jamie Keiles over at Teenagerie has figured out how ...

Ever wondered why it is that some night clubs charge women less for entry than they charge men, or let them drink for free? Is it because these establishments are aware of the gender pay gap and ...

The Feministing Five: Peggy Orenstein

Peggy Orenstein is the author of the New York Times bestselling book Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Frontlines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture. Orenstein’s book (her fourth – she also wrote the bestseller Schoolgirls: Young Women, Self Esteem and the Confidence Gap) is an exploration of our cultural fixation on pink and princesses and everything else we associated with girliness. Orenstein is herself the mother of a seven-year-old girl, and it was when her daughter went off to pre-school that Orenstein first became aware of how pervasive the princess obsession is, and just how aggressively it is marketed to very young girls.

What Orenstein found, when she began researching the reach and power of princess culture, and when she ...

Peggy Orenstein is the author of the New York Times bestselling book Cinderella Ate My Daughter: Dispatches from the Frontlines of the New Girlie-Girl Culture. Orenstein’s book (her fourth – she also wrote the bestseller Schoolgirls: Young ...

asherbrown

Youth Suicides, Andrew Shirvell, and America’s Tolerance of Anti-LGBT Hate

Yesterday, we found out about the fourth teen suicide this month after bullying and/or harassment by their school peers for being gay or perceived to be gay:

Rutgers University freshman Tyler Clementi jumped off the George Washington bridge last week after his roommate broadcasted a video of him hooking up with a boy on the internet. Tyler was a talented violinist. In response, the LGBT community at Rutgers has been protesting for safe space housing for queer students. 13-year old Asher Brown of Houston (picture to the right), TX shot himself in the head last week after 18 months of bullying by fellow students, and after 18 months of complaints by his parents for the school ...

Yesterday, we found out about the fourth teen suicide this month after bullying and/or harassment by their school peers for being gay or perceived to be gay:

Rutgers University freshman Tyler Clementi jumped off the George ...
longdistantrelationship

Long-distance relationships and gendered expectations


Kevin Johnson and Michelle Rhee

Yesterday I saw Going the Distance, the new rom-com about a dilemma faced by a lot of young professional couples: What happens when job opportunities put you in different cities? The movie — which I thought was better than a lot of films in this genre — is a pretty good depiction of how, in heterosexual couples, there is more of an expectation that the woman will be the one to suffer a professional setback or divert her career path in order to preserve the relationship. Drew Barrymore’s character is a 31-year-old intern who makes many references to the fact that she delayed her career because she moved for a previous boyfriend.

Today, ...


Kevin Johnson and Michelle Rhee

Yesterday I saw Going the Distance, the new rom-com about a dilemma faced by a lot of young professional couples: What happens when job opportunities put you in different cities? The ...

No Hee Hee, Ha Ha, For Me Joel Stein.

I suppose when you come across a writer so engulfed in snark, so above the tide, so cutting edge that it is almost impossible to touch their well thought out and clearly obvious humor that you find yourself paused, unable to dissect with the surgical precision of cutting analysis you have come to expect of Feministing. I mean, you should at least be able to stop and acknowledge that the author was kind of intelligent, had a strong point of view or made you LOL.

I really think Joel Stein was hoping he would get that kind of reaction about his column in this week’s TIME about his painful realization that his town was overrun by “Indians,” a deeply sad ...

I suppose when you come across a writer so engulfed in snark, so above the tide, so cutting edge that it is almost impossible to touch their well thought out and clearly obvious humor that you find ...

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