Posts Tagged Books

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Feministing Reads: Asali Solomon’s Disgruntled

In the foreword to her debut novel The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison describes how she came to write her classic story of an isolated black girl’s disavowal of blackness.

In the foreword to her debut novel The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison describes how she came to write her classic story of an isolated black girl’s disavowal of blackness.

berlatsky

Feministing Book Giveaway: Wonder Woman, by Noah Berlatsky

You’ll find many fans of Wonder Woman among the Feministing crew, which is why the last year has been a good one for our collective bookshelf: not one, but two books about the history of the woman with the lasso of truth! Today, we’re giving away copies of one of those welcome additions, Wonder Woman: Bondage and Feminism in the Marston/Peter Comics, 1941-1948, by Noah Berlatsky. 

You’ll find many fans of Wonder Woman among the Feministing crew, which is why the last year has been a good one for our collective bookshelf: not one, but two books about the history ...

citizen

Feministing Reads: Claudia Rankine’s Citizen

On the night of the grand jury’s failure to indict Darren Wilson for the murder of Michael Brown and again the night after, marching the length of Manhattan with a few thousand others, trying and failing to find some place sufficient to accommodate our anger or our grief, our newly or long-broken hearts, our need to feel responsive or responded to, a line from Claudia Rankine’s Citizen floated on the surface of my full skull: “To your mind, feelings are what create a person, something unwilling, something wild vandalizing whatever the skull holds. Those sensations form a someone.”

On the night of the grand jury’s failure to indict Darren Wilson for the murder of Michael Brown and again the night after, marching the length of Manhattan with a few thousand others, trying and failing to ...

The Feministing Five: ‘Everyone is Gay’

Interweaving comedy and advocacy, Dannielle Owens-Reid and Kristin Russo have delighted and empowered LGBTQ youth through their project, “Everyone is Gay.”  More of a platform than a website, “Everyone is Gay” combines videos, written advice, and a list of resources that is directed towards LGBTQ youth, striking a tone that is approaching, entertaining, and informative. Dannielle and Kristin also frequently tour colleges and communities around the country, where they are able to connect with their audience in person (and by connect, we mostly mean laugh).

After reaching such success with their initial project, Dannielle and Kristin are expanding their work to include resources for parents of LGBTQ youth with their newly created The ...

Interweaving comedy and advocacy, Dannielle Owens-Reid and Kristin Russo have delighted and empowered LGBTQ youth through their project, “Everyone is Gay.”  More of a platform than a website, “Everyone is Gay” combines videos, ...

Not Oprah’s Book Club: Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals

I first came across Patricia Lockwood’s second book of poetry, Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals, through this week’s internet buzz. The buzz is everywhere: a New York Times Magazine profile, condescending New Yorker and square Slate reviews, and an article in The Toast on the unsubtle heterosexism of said all male-authored reviews. Even after reading the book twice in private, it was difficult to experience her work separate from its online reception.

Perhaps this is fitting. Lockwood is arguably most well-known for her poem “Rape Joke,” which traveled meme-like across the web last year like no poem ever has, and anticipated its own hype: “The rape joke is if you write a poem called ...

I first came across Patricia Lockwood’s second book of poetry, Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals, through this week’s internet buzz. The buzz is everywhere: a New York Times Magazine profile, condescending New ...

Not Oprah’s Book Club: The Empathy Exams

The first essay of Leslie Jamison’s The Empathy Exams, from which the collection takes it title, begins with a declaration of performed pain: “My job title is medical actor, which means I get to play sick.” The final, “Grand Unified Theory of Female Pain,” ends with a “search for possibility.” It asks how we might understand this performed pain–bloody, self-inflicted, purple, feminized or otherwise–and also all pain, in all its painfulness, as real. The nine essays in between are exercises in not letting the violence of metaphor, and metaphorizing pain (the act of writing, really), overpower painful realities and the reality of pain itself. They are, as Jamison titles two paired series of shorter essays, “pain ...

The first essay of Leslie Jamison’s The Empathy Exams, from which the collection takes it title, begins with a declaration of performed pain: “My job title is medical actor, which means I get ...

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