Posts Tagged Black women

Why we need to get over Clair Huxtable

Brittney Cooper has a provocative piece up over at the Crunk Feminist Collective about (symbolically) slaying the patriarch and matriarch of The Cosby Show clan, Cliff and Clair Huxtable, in light of resurfaced concerns over real life patriarch Bill Cosby’s rape accusations. There’s a lot there to make you reconsider just how warm and fuzzy and lovable the character of Cliff Huxtable was. But here I want to talk about Clair.

I was born into a world where the Huxtables were near-universally beloved and held as the gold standard of black romantic possibilities. Each was an ideal partner in the context of a heteronormative relationship. But Clair even more so.

Brittney Cooper has a provocative piece up over at the Crunk Feminist Collective about (symbolically) slaying the patriarch and matriarch of The Cosby Show clan, Cliff and Clair Huxtable, in light of resurfaced concerns ...

When black women die from street harassment

Who cries when black women die?

I’m not asking that as some type of rhetorical, poetic question, meant to move you toward ferocious finger snaps. I want to know. Who cries when black women die?

Further, who cries when black women are killed?

Mary Spears was killed. The man who killed her did so because she refused to give him her phone number. She told him “I have a man I can’t talk to you,” and yet he persisted. Rather than respect her wishes to be left alone, he shot her.

Who cries when black women die from street harassment? 

Who cries when black women die?

I’m not asking that as some type of rhetorical, poetic question, meant to move you toward ferocious finger snaps. I want to know. Who cries when black women die?

Further, who cries ...

Keeping Marissa in mind

I was honored to participate in this campaign, Keeping Marissa in Mind, organized by the extraordinary activist Mariame Kaba. The poem I’m reading in this video is called “Flare” and it’s written by National Book Award winner Nikky Finney

I was honored to participate in this campaign, Keeping Marissa in Mind, organized by the extraordinary activist Mariame Kaba. The poem I’m reading in this video is called “Flare” and it’s written by ...

How about everyone who isn’t a black woman just stops writing about black women

After reading the New York Times story about television producing mogul Shonda Rhimes that starts by saying “When Shonda Rhimes writes her autobiography, it should be called ‘How to Get Away With Being an Angry Black Woman,'” I have a modest proposal. No one who isn’t a black woman should be allowed to write about the cultural products created by black women.

Not a forever moratorium, but at least, I don’t know, a couple decades. And this isn’t to say there aren’t talented, non-black woman cultural critics who have done good work around the music, art, film, and television produced by and centering black women. Slate has a decent piece up about “Clair Huxtable, feminist hero” written by ...

After reading the New York Times story about television producing mogul Shonda Rhimes that starts by saying “When Shonda Rhimes writes her autobiography, it should be called ‘How to Get Away With Being an Angry ...

Lauryn Hill dedicates version of her song “Black Rage” to Ferguson

Lauryn Hill has released a old sketch of her song “Black Rage” in honor of the people of Ferguson. Recorded in her living room, the song is set to the tune of “My Favorite Things.” Check out the lyrics after the jump. 

Lauryn Hill has released a old sketch of her song “Black Rage” in honor of the people of Ferguson. Recorded in her living room, the song is set to the tune of “My Favorite Things.” Check ...

Quote of the Day: “My past is littered with the bones of men…”

She said she was all too aware that if she was selected, she would represent several hundred male athletes in the N.B.A.; she would deal with league officials and agents who were nearly all men; she would negotiate with team owners who were almost all men; and she would stand before reporters who were predominantly men.

She did not flinch.  “My past,” she told the room, “is littered with the bones of men who were foolish enough to think I was someone they could sleep on.”

Meet the new head of the NBA players union, Michele A. Roberts. A former public defender, Roberts will be the first female leader of a major North American professional sports union.

She said she was all too aware that if she was selected, she would represent several hundred male athletes in the N.B.A.; she would deal with league officials and agents who were nearly all men; she ...

People of ferguson with their hands raised, lights on them at night

Why don’t we hear about women victims of state violence?

Over the last month, the media has blown up with the high-profile cases of racist violence at the hands of the police: the death of Eric Garner in a chokehold by the New York City Police Department, and the shooting death of Mike Brown at the hands of the police in Ferguson — not to mention the ongoing militarization of the protests as well as the harm inflicted on protesters — has had the nation talking once again about racist police violence, and racist anti-Black violence more generally. But as coverage of these incidents increases, why aren’t we hearing much about cases of police violence against women ...

Over the last month, the media has blown up with the high-profile cases of racist violence at the hands of the police: the death of Eric Garner in a chokehold by the New York City Police ...

New report calls on US to address racial discrimination in health care system

The Center for Reproductive Rights, the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, and SisterSong have collaborated on a disturbing new report on racial discrimination in health care in the US, particularly around the maternal health of Black women in the South and immigrants’ access to reproductive health care. The two main takeaways:

Black women nationwide are nearly four times as likely to die in childbirth as white women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Maternal mortality is nothing short of a human rights crisis in the country, with the United States’ maternal mortality rate increasing by 136 percent between 1990 and 2013, which is nearly double the rate of Saudi Arabia ...

The Center for Reproductive Rights, the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, and SisterSong have collaborated on a disturbing new report on racial discrimination in health care in the US, ...

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