Posts Tagged black girls

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SOLHOT’s Black Girl Genius Week

Last week, while many of you were working, going to school, or visiting and following the polls for midterm elections, something amazing was happening in a small college town in central Illinois.

Last week, while many of you were working, going to school, or visiting and following the polls for midterm elections, something amazing was happening in a small college town in central Illinois.

About that dad’s social media discipline: Sometimes it ain’t that deep

This week, ever vigilant “Feminist Twitter” has been abuzz about a black father in Louisville, Kentucky who posted these photos (and caption) of his daughter after he found out that she had broken several of his house rules. The critique and skepticism of this man’s form of discipline have ranged from claiming it was unnecessary and counterproductive in the face of the “real” issues that this girl must have, to calling it slut-shaming and emotionally abusive. The general sentiment seems to be that posting pictures of his daughter online invokes a disciplinary tradition of humiliation that can only be harmful. How I do I feel about it? Well, my personal opinion is that: it ain’t that deep.

This week, ever vigilant “Feminist Twitter” has been abuzz about a black father in Louisville, Kentucky who posted these photos (and caption) of his daughter after he found out that she had broken several of ...

How Bring It! is changing our perception of Black girls and performance

With another season of Lifetime’s show Bring It! behind us, I can’t help but reflect on all the ways in which the show adds nuance to media portrayal of Black girls. The fairly new reality show follows the competition season of a black majorette/dance team — the Dancing Dolls from Jackson, Mississippi. An alternative to the popular show Dance Moms, which focuses on the early careers of individual dancers and the moms who push them, Bring It! highlights the commitment that Black girls have made to dance as a hobby (and in some cases as a career) via the Dancing Dolls. The stories of the dancers, the coach Ms. Diana, and select ...

With another season of Lifetime’s show Bring It! behind us, I can’t help but reflect on all the ways in which the show adds nuance to media portrayal of ...

These are the names of Nigeria’s kidnapped girls

Update #2: Upon further reflection and having read Jina Moore’s piece exploring the internal Nigerian politics of releasing the names and the specific concerns brought up by the governor of Borno state, we’ve decided to adjust this list to include the first names of the girls only. 

Update #1: Some readers have expressed concern that posting these names may put the girls at further risk. We take that concern seriously, but given that the list has been released by a Nigerian organization and has been reported on by both the Nigerian and US media, we feel comfortable keeping it up here. We hope that the good that comes from putting names to this injustice outweighs any potential harm caused by their ...

Update #2: Upon further reflection and having read Jina Moore’s piece exploring the internal Nigerian politics of releasing the names and the specific concerns brought up by the governor of Borno state, we’ve decided to adjust this ...

Watch: bell hooks and Salamishah Tillet on the welfare of Black girls

bell hooks is currently a scholar-in-residence at The New School. Last night, hooks had a conversation with Salamishah Tillet about the cultural devaluation of Black girls. It’s a topic that’s certainly being discussed around these parts. The entire conversation was livestreamed, and you can watch the full video below:

bell hooks is currently a scholar-in-residence at The New School. Last night, hooks had a conversation with Salamishah Tillet about the cultural devaluation of Black girls. It’s a topic that’s ...

Understanding the R. Kelly phenomenon — and then ending it

Much has been written about R. Kelly in recent weeks. The release have of his latest album coupled with this Village Voice interview with Jim DeRogatis, the reporter who broke the story on the singer’s alleged child pornography, has people talking again, and for good reason. R. Kelly is a known predator being provided ample chances at redemption without so much as a nod to remorse, let alone any legal accountability for the lives he has damaged. In response, Zerlina wrote about how no one should be listening to his music, Jamilah Lemieux asks whether or not you yourself were wrong about R. Kelly, Michael Arceneaux tells us it’s never too late to start hating him, and ...

Much has been written about R. Kelly in recent weeks. The release have of his latest album coupled with this Village Voice interview with Jim DeRogatis, the reporter who broke the story on the singer’s alleged ...

Statement about my “Age & Consent” post

Editor’s note: Sesali made the decision to take down the original post. Here is a statement from her:

My original post, about my experience with consent was an excerpt from something on my personal blog. It was a mistake for me to think that everyone would be able to clearly define what is mine vs. what is Feministing’s.

Let me be even more clear than I am in the original post, which you can find if you are connected to me on any social media: my own personal experiences with consent at 13 are just that, mine. Thanks for letting me cook and engaging in these difficult conversations with me.

Editor’s note: Sesali made the decision to take down the original post. Here is a statement from her:

My original post, about my experience with consent was an excerpt from something on my personal blog. It ...

Welcoming a new digital space: what “hood feminism” means to me

There is so much power in a pen (or a keyboard). Creating language to describe our lived experience is so transcending, turning abstract principles into discourse. I was reminded of this when I first heard about hood feminism. Blogger Jamie defines the parameters of her own existence and the ways in which she felt out of place in feminist spaces. She says:

“While Big Name Feminists are debating The End of Men, women on the margins–women like me–are sleeping at train stations and working double shifts for paltry wages. They are buying school supplies with rent money. They are fighting for citizenship because they aren’t the ‘right kind of immigrants.'”

This is reflective of the concerns that many women of ...

There is so much power in a pen (or a keyboard). Creating language to describe our lived experience is so transcending, turning abstract principles into discourse. I was reminded of this when I first heard about