Posts Tagged Arts

Sins Invalid: The film

I’ve followed Sins Invalid for a few years now, and always lamented that I haven’t been in Bay Area during their yearly performance. They are:

Sins Invalid is a San Francisco/Bay Area based performance project that celebrates artists with disabilities, centralizing artists of color and queer and gender-variant artists. Since 2006, our performances have explored themes of sexuality, embodiment, and the disabled body, impacting thousands through live performance.

Now Sins is working to turn their show into a documentary, so that people far and wide can experience their work.

I’m excited.

Like many groups, they are turning to kickstarter to get some funding going. Check out their page and see if you want to support. A donation of $35 ...

I’ve followed Sins Invalid for a few years now, and always lamented that I haven’t been in Bay Area during their yearly performance. They are:

Sins Invalid is a San Francisco/Bay Area based performance project ...

A feminist in art school

I’m in grad school right now, pursuing an MFA in Printmaking. Maybe not the degree folks who know me from political work would expect. I was born with a crayon in my hand – I’ve been making art my whole life. I was blessed to attend the Boston Arts Academy, a public visual and performing arts high school (I wrote about this extraordinary school here). And my undergraduate thesis was in printmaking.

Working in politics in DC for the past two years sapped me of my passion and creativity – needless to say it wasn’t a great time for my art. So I couldn’t be happier to have moved to one of my favorite cities and to be attending San ...

I’m in grad school right now, pursuing an MFA in Printmaking. Maybe not the degree folks who know me from political work would expect. I was born with a crayon in my hand – I’ve been making ...

In memory of Cheryl B.

Today is Cheryl’s birthday, and all of the Facebook posts reminded me that I’ve meant to write a post about her and her life since she died earlier this year.

Cheryl was a queer poet and activist living in New York City. I got to know her through my friendship with Sinclair Sexsmith, and through the reading series they co-hosted, Sideshow Queer Literary Carnival. I read at their Butch/Femme show last summer, and it was really an incredible event.

Cheryl died, relatively suddenly, in June because of a complication from her cancer treatment. It was a big loss for the community, and the memorial held in her honor was such incredible proof of the impact she had as a writer and ...

Today is Cheryl’s birthday, and all of the Facebook posts reminded me that I’ve meant to write a post about her and her life since she died earlier this year.

Cheryl was a queer poet and activist living ...

Maine Governor Paul LePage Threatens Workers Rights Mural

Last Friday, on the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, Maine governor Paul LePage announced plans to remove a mural from Maine’s Department of Labor building painted by artist Judy Taylor of Tremont, ME. The Portland Press Herald writes,
“The 36-foot-long, 11 panel mural depicts the state’s labor history, including a shoe worker strike in Lewiston, female shipbuilders and striking papermakers in Jay.” Gov. LePage also ordered the renaming of Department’s conference rooms, four of which are named after women including Frances Perkins, the first female Cabinet member, and Marion Martin, founder of the National Federation of Republican Women. Another one of the conference rooms is named for Cesar Chavez. 
LePage says removing the mural and renaming the ...

Last Friday, on the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, Maine governor Paul LePage announced plans to remove a mural from Maine’s Department of Labor building painted by artist Judy Taylor of Tremont, ME. The ...

The Nutcracker: a beloved holiday tradition and a refuge for racism

For as long as I can remember, the holiday season has been Nutcracker season. My mother grew up watching Balanchine’s Nutcracker at the New York City Ballet, and made sure to introduce me and my sister both to ballet class and to the Nutcracker. As a result, even though Australian dance schools don’t perform the ballet every year the way many American schools do, I grew up knowing and loving this ballet above all others. We used to visit our family in the US once a year, during the Australian summer holidays, which meant that we often had a chance to see Balanchine’s Nutcracker for ourselves. Now that I live in New York, the world’s best-loved production of the ballet ...

For as long as I can remember, the holiday season has been Nutcracker season. My mother grew up watching Balanchine’s Nutcracker at the New York City Ballet, and made sure to introduce me and my sister both ...

“Sexism” in the Sweet realm – a big fat follow-up post

Last week, I blogged about Alastair Macaulay, the New York Times dance critic who, in his review of the New York City Ballet’s performance of The Nutcracker, said some insulting and uncalled for things about the size of two principal dancers. Of Jennifer Ringer and Jared Angle, Macaulay said that Ringer “looked as if she’d eaten one sugarplum too many,” and that Angle, “seems to have been sampling half the Sweet realm.”

It was a really bitchy, cruel thing to say, and apparently I wasn’t the only one who thought so. Macaulay received a lot of mail about that review and so, in the weekend Times, he wrote an article defending it. In that article, he calls people ...

Last week, I blogged about Alastair Macaulay, the New York Times dance critic who, in his review of the New York City Ballet’s performance of The Nutcracker, said some insulting and uncalled for things about ...

Wasserstein award for emerging female playwrights may be given out after all

I wrote on Monday about the decision not to award any of the nominated emerging female playrights the $25, 000 Wasserstein prize.

An uproar in response to their decision ensued, including an online petition with almost 1,500 signatures.

The Theatre Development Fund, who administers the prize, responded and decided to come up with a new evaluation for this year’s prize:

That day [Monday], TDF announced it would reexamine its selection process over the next two months. “Mindful of the concerns of this year’s nominees and the deadline facing the funder as it considers whether or not to renew funding in 2011, we have decided to accelerate the refinement process rather than postpone it to next year ...

I wrote on Monday about the decision not to award any of the nominated emerging female playrights the $25, 000 Wasserstein prize.

An uproar in response to their decision ensued, including an online petition with almost ...

Emerging female playwrights told that none are deserving of Wasserstein Award

The Wasserstein Award is an annual award given to an emerging female playwright who has yet to receive recognition for their work. Nominations were solicited for the award, but this year, the committee rejected all of the nominees because, in their words, none were “truly outstanding.”

Anna Clark at Isak shares an open letter from Playwright Michael Lew to the committee charged with giving out the award. Michael says:

This decision can only be interpreted as a blanket indictment on the quality of female emerging writers and their work, and is insulting not only to the finalists but also to the many theatre professionals who nominated these writers and deemed their plays prize worthy. ...

The Wasserstein Award is an annual award given to an emerging female playwright who has yet to receive recognition for their work. Nominations were solicited for the award, but this year, the committee rejected all of the ...

Load More