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Alison Park @park718 ?

active 2 years, 4 months ago
"Why does Starbucks hate women? It’s true: every day is a bad day for women’s rights. The last few weeks have especially sucked (think Limbaugh and “whore pills” herald International Women’s Day). Nevertheless, and call it naïveté or foolish optimism, when [...]" · View
  • Alison Park commented on the blog post In defense of S.E. Cupp   2 years, 4 months ago · View

    Thanks for reinforcing the lines when the lines are all being crossed. This sh*t is crazy, unsurprising as as usual, enraging.

  • Alison Park posted an update:   2 years, 7 months ago · View

    Why does Starbucks hate women?

    It’s true: every day is a bad day for women’s rights. The last few weeks have especially sucked (think Limbaugh and “whore pills” herald International Women’s Day). Nevertheless, and call it naïveté or foolish optimism, when I go to Starbucks for over-priced coffee, I don’t expect to be the target of the same kind of misogyny and degradation I experience at the hands of the legislature, while walking down the street, or listening to syndicated pundits—or for Starbucks to lend a helping hand.

    Last month a male Starbucks customer verbally attacked me, using the words b*tch and a c*nt repeatedly. The store was packed, including 2 young boys who were sitting next to him. The situation was escalating, and when I went to ask the manager to ask him to leave, the customer continued shouting across the store. The manager explained that she couldn’t ask him to leave. I took it to Starbucks, and after 3 weeks of silence, Starbucks district manager Kathleen Rainsbottom called me to tell me that she decided not to ban the abusive customer because he is a regular, daily customer. Ms. Rainsbottom then insisted that it was a “personal dispute” that happened to occur on Starbucks property, and that there was not enough “evidence” of verbal harassment.

    Is Starbucks’ bottom line more important than the safety of women? Seems like it to me. A quick Google search of “Starbucks sexual harassment” brought up pages of links to the explosive 2010 case of a teenage female worker who was being forced almost daily to perform sexual acts by her adult male manager. Investigation revealed that other Starbucks managers and supervisors were aware of what was happening and allowed it to continue. When Starbucks’ law firm turned to publicize the young woman’s sex life, she said in an interview with 20/20: ”They are trying to defend themselves by calling me a slut…It’s intimidation. It’s harassing to sit though deposition and just be re-victimized.” Starbucks’ track record in protecting the safety of women and children doesn’t seem any better when it comes to their customers, if women who are called degrading gender-based expletives while trying to enjoy a cup of Joe can expect Starbucks employees to stand idly by.

    My demands are simple. Starbucks must ban the offending individual, train their staff on how to handle situations involving gender-based harassment, and send a clear message to the women, children and families of Jackson Heights and New York City that it does not tolerate any abuse towards women in their stores. Anti-Street Harassment Week is March 18-22, 2012 http://www.meetusonthestreet.org/—take a minute to help keep our streets safe for women and girls and a minute to tell Starbucks you won’t support them until it makes its stores safe spaces for women and children too.

    Take action. Call: Starbucks District Manager Kathleen Rainsbottom (646) 361-5800 and Regional Manager John Dunn (212) 613-1280 ext. 2202 and tell them to meet the demands of case no. 8294434 and that you won’t support a business that keep safe spaces for women and children. Tweet: Why does @Starbucks hate women? Keep Starbucks a safe space for women #womensday #EndSHWeek. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Starbucks “Why does Starbucks hate women? I will not support Starbucks until it bans customers who verbally degrade women and keep its stores safe for women and children. Meet the demands of case no. 8294434.” Email: info@starbucks.com or by web-form http://www.starbucks.com/customer-service/contact/retail-stores-form

  • Alison Park posted an update:   2 years, 7 months ago · View

    Why does Starbucks hate women?

    It’s true: every day is a bad day for women’s rights. The last few weeks have especially sucked (think Limbaugh and “whore pills” herald International Women’s Day). Nevertheless, and call it naïveté or foolish optimism, when I go to Starbucks for over-priced coffee, I don’t expect to be the target of the same kind of misogyny and degradation I experience at the hands of the legislature, while walking down the street, or listening to syndicated pundits—or for Starbucks to lend a helping hand.

    Last month a male Starbucks customer verbally attacked me, using the words b*tch and a c*nt repeatedly. The store was packed, including 2 young boys who were sitting next to him. The situation was escalating, and when I went to ask the manager to ask him to leave, the customer continued shouting across the store. The manager explained that she couldn’t ask him to leave. I took it to Starbucks, and after 3 weeks of silence, Starbucks district manager Kathleen Rainsbottom called me to tell me that she decided not to ban the abusive customer because he is a regular, daily customer. Ms. Rainsbottom then insisted that it was a “personal dispute” that happened to occur on Starbucks property, and that there was not enough “evidence” of verbal harassment.

    Is Starbucks’ bottom line more important than the safety of women? Seems like it to me. A quick Google search of “Starbucks sexual harassment” brought up pages of links to the explosive 2010 case of a teenage female worker who was being forced almost daily to perform sexual acts by her adult male manager. Investigation revealed that other Starbucks managers and supervisors were aware of what was happening and allowed it to continue. When Starbucks’ law firm turned to publicize the young woman’s sex life, she said in an interview with 20/20: ”They are trying to defend themselves by calling me a slut…It’s intimidation. It’s harassing to sit though deposition and just be re-victimized.” Starbucks’ track record in protecting the safety of women and children doesn’t seem any better when it comes to their customers, if women who are called degrading gender-based expletives while trying to enjoy a cup of Joe can expect Starbucks employees to stand idly by.

    My demands are simple. Starbucks must ban the offending individual, train their staff on how to handle situations involving gender-based harassment, and send a clear message to the women, children and families of Jackson Heights and New York City that it does not tolerate any abuse towards women in their stores. Anti-Street Harassment Week is March 18-22, 2012 http://www.meetusonthestreet.org/—take a minute to help keep our streets safe for women and girls and a minute to tell Starbucks you won’t support them until it makes its stores safe spaces for women and children too.

    Take action. Call: Starbucks District Manager Kathleen Rainsbottom (646) 361-5800 and Regional Manager John Dunn (212) 613-1280 ext. 2202 and tell them to meet the demands of case no. 8294434 and that you won’t support a business that keep safe spaces for women and children. Tweet: Why does @Starbucks hate women? Keep Starbucks a safe space for women #womensday #EndSHWeek. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Starbucks “Why does Starbucks hate women? I will not support Starbucks until it bans customers who verbally degrade women and keep its stores safe for women and children. Meet the demands of case no. 8294434.” Email: info@starbucks.com or by web-form http://www.starbucks.com/customer-service/contact/retail-stores-form

  • Alison Park became a registered member   2 years, 7 months ago · View

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