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Barbies will ruin my future daughter’s life, and here’s why

Last week I made a somewhat precocious decision: at 22, with no prospect of getting married or pregnant in the near future, I decided that I will never buy my future daughter a Barbie. I am sure she will beg for one, and I will allow that real parents might say I don’t know what I am talking about (and maybe I don’t), but I just won’t buy a Barbie. And I’ll tell you why.

1)      A real life Barbie would have size 2 feet. She would have creepy toddler feet and my daughter would want that for herself. My daughter would be self-conscious about the size of her feet FOR THE REST OF HER LIFE. She would always find herself hiding her feet that look like duck feet in comparison to Barbie’s pathetic little feet. Barbie feet are so small that if she was a real person she would actually have to move around on all fours.

2)      Pink overload. Seriously, what the hell? Why is 80% of Barbie’s wardrobe pink?  Her house is also pink. And her car. And most of her shoes and her lipstick. Why doesn’t she get sick of the colour pink? I bet if she was a real person you would see her in one of those shows about compulsive people who collect weird things. She would be a hoarder of pink things. Psycho.

3)      Complete disregard for STRANGER DANGER. Right, so 90% of Barbie’s world’s male population is called ...

Authorities must stop treating sexual abuse charges with ‘caution’

When someone is murdered, an investigation is launched. When a victim is paralyzed when mugged at gun point, no one asks why they didn’t scream or says they asked for it. When someone is robbed, the judge doesn’t tell the victims they should have shouted in protest against the violation of their home to prove that it was done against their will.

But somehow the conduct for sexual abuse victims does not make as much sense as that. They are not met with open ears and investigators ready to find the guilty party – they are met with wariness, defiance and inclinations for a cover up.

This week, Fleet Street Fox wrote about the Jimmy Savile scandal. She numbered how many ...

When someone is murdered, an investigation is launched. When a victim is paralyzed when mugged at gun point, no one asks why they didn’t scream or says they asked for it. When someone is robbed, the judge ...

Five feminist teachings in Parks and Recreation

Amy Poehler has created a brilliant feminist TV series and, more importantly, differential feminist models we can all look up to. Parks and Recreation is about a government employee who believes in change above anything else and her endeavours to change her hometown Pawnee, despite the stagnant pace of government action.

Leslie Knope is the most obvious role model in the show, as her office has numerous inspirational women hanging on the wall and her policies and plans are clearly focused on gender equality. But as I was rewatching the show this weekend, I realized there is more to this show than the remarkable strength and determination of Leslie Knope.

Parks & Rec is extremely clever writing, I daresay it is even ...

Amy Poehler has created a brilliant feminist TV series and, more importantly, differential feminist models we can all look up to. Parks and Recreation is about a government employee who believes in change above anything else and ...

Intersectionality, let’s unite!

“Right here, in this conference room,” said a woman in her early twenties to Leymah Gbowee, Nobel Peace prize winner. “Only around five or six women are black, among a hundred or so. As a black woman yourself, what do you think we should do about the exclusion of black women from spaces like this?”

After years of speaking in conferences about her experience in the women’s peace movement in Liberia, Leymah had the answer at the tip of her tongue. Standing on the stage in her motley trademark dress and headdress, she looked at the young black woman straight in the eyes and assertively answered he charged question.

“We are all women, and we must stand together as women. We should ...

“Right here, in this conference room,” said a woman in her early twenties to Leymah Gbowee, Nobel Peace prize winner. “Only around five or six women are black, among a hundred or so. As a black woman ...