Comedian Aziz Ansari holds an award.

Weekly Feminist Cheat Sheet: Oh boy 2018

Welcome back to weekly feminist cheat sheets. Here is our first for 2018.

I’m not sure about you, but this week for me, was basically trying to keep on top of the allegations against Aziz Ansari, the unsurprising but outrageous backlash, and the array of smart, thoughtful pieces delving into the coercion(s) women experience — which while distinct from say, being attacked by Harvey Weinstein — are painful and more importantly, far too common.

My favorite: Osita Nwanevu’s “There Is No Rampaging #MeToo Mob.” Also worth reading: Megan Garber’s “Aziz Ansarai and the Paradox of ‘No’“, Jill Filipovic’s “The poorly reported Aziz Ansari expose was a missed opportunity,and “not that bad” on KatyKatiKate.

The rest of my week was spent trying to keep track of the blitz of attacks by the government on immigrant communities. One of the most heinous: ICE keeps raiding hospitals and mistreating disabled children. Read David Perry on how the fight for disability rights in 2018, is a fight for immigrant rights.

To be expected, the Administration/regime is also appealing a judge’s ruling last week that blocked Trump’s move to end DACA.

Last week, the government announced it would terminate the temporary protected status of nearly 200,000 Salvadarons (then denounced El Salvador as a “shithole”). After experiencing violence or the constant threat of it here in the United States, these deported women face a deadly welcome from street gangs back in El Salvador.

Lastly, this week was filled by some beautiful, inspiring actions by communities looking this horror in the eye and fighting back: 86 rabbis and Jewish activists were arrested on Capitol Hill at an incredibleDACA protest (watch video from the action here); undocumented youth took to the streets in LA to demand a clean Dream Act (follow The Seed Project to watch their live streams); and Muslim Girl founder Amani Al-Khatahtbeh rejected Revlon’s Changemaker Award because of Gal Gadot’s ambassadorship of the new “Live Boldly” campaign.

Amani’s action — telling Gadot that “#TimesUp for invisible girls, too” — is a needed rejection at the start of 2018 of the faux liberal feminism that coopts feminist rhetoric while still supporting militarism, Zionism, and other violence against vulnerable women. Read Isis Briones coverage in Teen Vogue here as well as Meghna’s piece on why liberal feminism must — like Amani — stand with Palestinian girls like Ahed Tamimi.

PS: the New York Times is looking for new, young voices. Here’s the application. Check it out, apply, and maybe get the Times to finally cover our communities and our fights in less moronic ways.

 

Mahroh Jahangiri is the former Executive Director of Know Your IX, a national survivor- and youth-led organization working to end gender violence in schools. She cares about the ways in which American militarization, racism, and sexual violence impact communities of color transnationally. You can say hi to her at @mahrohj.

Mahroh Jahangiri is the former Executive Director of Know Your IX, a national survivor- and youth-led organization working to end gender violence in schools.

Read more about Mahroh

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