Guttmacher Institute: Many people find it difficult to pay for an abortion procedure, are unable to use insurance

The Guttmacher Institute has published a new study on payment for abortion care among U.S. women showing that as much as *half* of all abortion patients rely on assistance to cover the costs. Among the most disturbing and frustrating findings is that many women who are covered by insurance are not able to use the insurance, either because they aren’t aware they are covered or because they are concerned about stigma. From the accompanying release:

Most women who have abortions have health insurance, but most still pay out-of-pocket for abortion services, according to “At What Cost? Payment for Abortion Care by U.S. Women,” by Rachel Jones of the Guttmacher Institute et al., published online in the journal Women’s Health Issues. This is true for women with both public and private health insurance. The most common reason women reported not using their insurance was that they believed their plan didn’t cover it (46%)—either because they were told abortion was not covered or more often assumed it was not. About one in 10 women indicated that they did not want to use their insurance, presumably because of stigma or concerns about confidentiality.

Read the whole thing, and if you are so moved donate to your local abortion fund.

Brooklyn, NY

Lori Adelman is a writer and advocate focusing on race, gender, and sexual and reproductive rights. In addition to her work at Feministing, Lori is an Associate Director at Planned Parenthood Global. Lori has previously worked at the United Nations Foundation, the International Women’s Health Coalition, and Human Rights Watch, and has written for a host of print and digital properties including Rookie Magazine, The Grio, and the New York Times Magazine. She regularly appears on radio and television, and has spoken at college campuses across the U.S. about topics like the politics of black hair, transnational movement building, and the undercover feminism of Nicki Minaj. In 2014, she was named to The Root 100 list of the nation's most influential African Americans, and to the Forbes Magazine list of the "30 Under 30" successful people in media.

Lori Adelman is an Executive Director of Feministing in charge of Partnerships.

Read more about Lori

Join the Conversation