Weekly Feminist Reader

Romnesia!

It’s Breast Cancer Awareness month. Beware of the corporate pinkification.

A great piece by Mary Elizabeth Williams on the war on 12-year-old girls.

Just when you thought you couldn’t hate the Boy Scouts any more, there’s this.

In case this wasn’t already abundantly clear, a new study shows that “that neural biases to race are not innate and that race is a social construction, learned over time.

If you feel the need to get caught up on the Dinesh D’Souza’s scandal, here’s a guide with gifs a-plenty.

Live Action’s latest “sting” against pro-choice groups is maybe the biggest flop yet.

LGBT celebs for Obama!

Mormon feminists for Obama!

Andrew Goldman was suspended for the NYT for a month after his terribly sexist tweet at Jennifer Weiner.

Wow. A former student tells her story of being raped and then completely failed by the administration at Amherst college. Hopefully the school will actually make some changes.

Nona re-reads Shulamith Firestone and finds “a reminder to go on the offensive.”

Up for some truly infuriating mansplaining? Watch Mika do her best to try to get these dudes to listen to her.

In China, “leftover women” are defined as unmarried women over the age of 27.

Rep. Joe Walsh claims there’s “not one instance” when abortion was necessary to save the life of the pregnant woman, the backtracks and tries a laughable counter-attack.

Help Romney catch women in his binder!

Uruguay became the second Latin American country to legalize abortion.

A moving piece by Spectra on Spirit Day and being a queer youth of color.

Watch this Missouri pastor’s speech against marriage equality all the way to the end.

Here’s a cool ad campaign from the Maine Coalition Against Sexual Assault.

Michelle Dean on the Amanda Todd, the Redditt troll, and the limits of free speech online. “It is a cultural myth—one particular to the Internet—that the methods of a harasser are fundamentally ‘legal,’ and that the state is helpless to intervene in all cases like this.”

Check out this map to find out what the gender pay gap is in your state.

A devastating investigative report on solitary confinement at California’s Pelican Bay prison.

What have you been reading/writing/watching/learning this week?

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8 Comments

  1. Posted October 21, 2012 at 11:26 am | Permalink

    Camouflage — On yoga, strength, and people’s perceptions of what strong abs look like.

    Why I’m Voting Yes on Prop 204 — On an Arizona ballot initiative to make permanent a sales tax increase to fund, in part, education.

    And an Everyday Yoga call for lunge submissions with chair modifications.

  2. Posted October 21, 2012 at 1:13 pm | Permalink

    This week I’ve written about a couple of things that have been in the news: firstly, the story of two teenagers whose parents found out their children were gay due to Facebook’s stupid privacy controls; and secondly Timothy Kurek, the straight man who pretended to be gay for a year in an attempt, I guess, to pry open his tiny mind.

  3. Posted October 21, 2012 at 1:24 pm | Permalink

    Last Sunday I had food poisoning, which made me ponder about how society values thinness over health.

    I also wrote a little bit about the male opinions I encountered this week.

  4. Posted October 21, 2012 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

    I just read a really good article about gender depictions in videogames. Great visuals and good discussion.

  5. Posted October 21, 2012 at 8:17 pm | Permalink

    Check out this article on reproductive justice and the War on Women, published on Fem2pt0:

    http://www.fem2pt0.com/2012/10/17/no-one-wins-a-tug-of-war-on-women-from-uteri-to-personhood-why-feminists-must-reframe-the-debate/

  6. Posted October 21, 2012 at 8:21 pm | Permalink

    In regards to Shulamith Firestone, here’s a recent article from The Villager about the push to make her apartment into an affordable (for what that neighborhood currently is these days :( ) housing for other feminists activists/students/scholars.

    http://www.thevillager.com/?p=8059

    Fran Luck, one of the people spearheading this campaign, is a longtime feminist and housing rights activist on the Lower East Side.

  7. Posted October 21, 2012 at 10:15 pm | Permalink

    This week at The Provider Project, Kelly adds a new installment to the “Radical Figures in Health History” series. This month she profiles Dr. Marie Equi, a radical doctor active in labor and anti-war struggles during the early 1900′s.

  8. Posted October 22, 2012 at 12:44 pm | Permalink

    My series on my friend Leigh, who died in 1995 of a heroin overdose, continues as we approach the anniversary of her death at the end of this week. This looks like it’s going to be an 8-part series, and here are posts 5-7:

    Part V

    Part VI

    Part VII

    Content note/trigger warning: bulimia, drug use, references to violence and sexual assault, gneral obnoxious college behavhior and ignorance, strip clubs, etc. Just bad stuff all around.

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