Thirteen year old badass on slut shaming

This video’s a bit old, but I hadn’t seen it before, and it’s amazing.

This gives me hope for the future right now.

Update: Huge thank you to Feministing reader Sorcha for typing up a transcript, which you can find after the jump. I also received transcripts from readers Caitlin and Libbie. The Feministing community rules.

Hi!
So, the 27th of August is kind of a big deal for me as a YouTuber.
*But Why?* Because, as of then, I will have been on YouTube for two years. Two Years. What? Crazy, right?
To commemorate this special occasion, I want to do the 7 Days 7 Topics Challenge. That title is pretty self-explanatory but it basically means that every day up to, and including, the 27th, I’ll be doing a video on a topic that’s important to me.
[Disclosure: I don't know everything, and I'm not going to pretend to. If you disagree with me on a topic, that's fine. Let's all just stay mature, respectful and classy ;) ]

Anyway, let’s hop to it!

Today’s topic: slut shaming and why it’s wrong. So first off, what the hell is slut shaming? Slut shaming is the unfortunate phenomenon in which people degrade or mock a woman because she dresses in tight or revealing clothing, enjoys sex, has sex a lot or may even just be *rumored* to participate in sexual activity. The message that slut shaming sends to women is that sex is bad, having sex with more than one person is horrible, and everyone will hate you for having sex at all. That message is complete and utter, excuse my French, bullshit. Yes, I’m 13 and I said the word ‘bullshit’. Yes, I’m 13 and I’m talking about slut shaming. Deal with it.

Anyway, if you’ve given your consent, if you’re emotionally and physically ready for it, if you’re using proper protection, and if you feel safe and comfortable with your partner, then sex is good. It is nobody’s business but your own how many people you’re having sex with, or how much sex you have, and you don’t deserve to be hated on for being sexually active with more than one partner.

Slut shaming also contributes to rape culture/rape-supportive culture. Rape culture is a culture in which sexual violence against women is commonplace and in which prominent attitudes tolerate said sexual violence. Slut shaming contributes to this by sending the message that it’s OK to rape sluts because, by having too much sex or dressing in tight and revealing clothing, they’re somehow asking for it. Rape is caused by rapists, misogyny, structural violence and institutional tolerance, not by women’s clothing or make up, not the way she talks, or walks, not by her drinking, not by her ‘not being careful enough’, and certainly not be her being a slut.

Sonya Barnett and Heather Jarvis said: “being in charge of our sexual lives should not mean that we are opening ourselves to an expectation of violence regardless if we participate in sex for work or pleasure”.

Slut shaming takes away women’s rights to express themselves sexually without fear of being scrutinized by men and other women, and it objectifies women’s bodies.

What I’m getting at here is that slut shaming is wrong at any age. I’m noticing a lot of other girls my age starting to say it and it just shocks me every time. How could they use such offensive language in such a casual manner? It’s like they don’t even know the meaning behind their words, and that’s the thing – they don’t know.

So if you watching this know somebody who slut shames, pass this video along. They could learn something. I mean, it might not work but how awesome would it be to change the opinion of even just one person? Simple actions can have the biggest impact.

[Inaudible] …tomorrow, for another topical video. Hasta la vista!

Boston, MA

Jos Truitt is Executive Director of Development at Feministing. She joined the team in July 2009, became an Editor in August 2011, and Executive Director in September 2013. She writes about a range of topics including transgender issues, abortion access, and media representation. Jos first got involved with organizing when she led a walk out against the Iraq war at her high school, the Boston Arts Academy. She was introduced to the reproductive justice movement while at Hampshire College, where she organized the Civil Liberties and Public Policy Program’s annual reproductive justice conference. She has worked on the National Abortion Federation’s hotline, was a Field Organizer at Choice USA, and has volunteered as a Pro-Choice Clinic Escort. Jos has written for publications including The Guardian, Bilerico, RH Reality Check, Metro Weekly, and the Columbia Journalism Review. She has spoken and trained at numerous national conferences and college campuses about trans issues, reproductive justice, blogging, feminism, and grassroots organizing. Jos completed her MFA in Printmaking at the San Francisco Art Institute in Spring 2013. In her "spare time" she likes to bake and work on projects about mermaids.

Jos Truitt is an Executive Director of Feministing in charge of Development.

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