What We Missed

Oh thank goodness, Skechers is here to tone our little girls’ butts! There is nothing more disturbing than a second-grader with a flabby butt. Oh wait, yes there is: a brand that tries to sell “butt shaping” shoes to children!

Hugo Schwyzer, who is helping to organize Slut Walk LA, on the meaning of the word “slut” and the meaning of the protests.

Under the new Australian budget, young mothers who receive welfare will have to go back to work or education sooner than they currently do if they want to keep receiving payments. Some feminist bloggers in Australia are objecting to the new “tough love” measures.

Questions about what it means to be “sex positive?” Clarisse at Feministe breaks it down for you.

New York, NY

Chloe Angyal is a journalist and scholar of popular culture from Sydney, Australia. She joined the Feministing team in 2009. Her writing about politics and popular culture has been published in The Atlantic, The Guardian, New York magazine, Reuters, The LA Times and many other outlets in the US, Australia, UK, and France. She makes regular appearances on radio and television in the US and Australia. She has an AB in Sociology from Princeton University and a PhD in Arts and Media from the University of New South Wales. Her academic work focuses on Hollywood romantic comedies; her doctoral thesis was about how the genre depicts gender, sex, and power, and grew out of a series she wrote for Feministing, the Feministing Rom Com Review. Chloe is a Senior Facilitator at The OpEd Project and a Senior Advisor to The Harry Potter Alliance. You can read more of her writing at chloesangyal.com

Chloe Angyal is a journalist and scholar of popular culture from Sydney, Australia.

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Join the Conversation

  • http://feministing.com/members/broggly/ Broggly

    How sad is it that before I read the word “shoes” I thought that someone was making primary schoolers do squats and for some reason you were against it.

  • http://feministing.com/members/xocoatl/ Pat

    people under 18 frequently have sex, want to learn about sex, talk about sex, talk about body parts, touch each other (and older people) with and without consent, get touched by each other (and older people) with and without consent and much, much more.

    Why, then, are young people not relevant to discourses about the body? Should sexuality be something we keep from young people until the magic Disney moment on their 18th birthday where they become men/women?

    I don’t think the Jezebel article or its mention of feministing is sufficiently nuanced or fair to young people.