Class Action Suit Filed Against Department of Defense

This morning, NBC aired a piece about the epidemic of sexual violence towards women in the military.

I chose to participate in this lawsuit because there are changes that need to be made.  Leadership needs to be held accountable and women need to be able to work without the fear of being assaulted by their own colleagues.  This is one the hardest things I’ve ever done and I want to thank the other women that have stepped forward as well.  It’s never easy to put yourself out there and I’m sure there will be plenty of victim blaming and other trials that we all will have to deal with as a result of going public.

I also want to thank the feminist community for providing me with much encouragement (that most of you don’t even know you provided) and for starting me down a path that I will continue to pursue.  I would love nothing more to see an end of the rape culture we live in and hope that my actions will help further that goal.

Rebekah Havrilla

Disclaimer: This post was written by a Feministing Community user and does not necessarily reflect the views of any Feministing columnist, editor, or executive director.

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“Mass Molestations” Show Why We Still Can’t Talk About Sexual Violence in India

With the onset of 2017 came a forceful reminder to women in India: we don’t belong in public spaces, and we will be punished for any attempt to inhabit them. A Bangalore Mirror story shocked the country with a report that a public New Year’s Eve party in the heart of the metropolitan, progressive city was invaded by “hooligans” who attacked and molested the women present at the gathering, while threatening and intimidating the men and children at the scene with them. Women reported being verbally harassed, molested, groped by a “huge group of unruly men,” and forced to escape the scene of the crime with their heels in their hands. The “brazen mass molestation” of women occurred despite ...

With the onset of 2017 came a forceful reminder to women in India: we don’t belong in public spaces, and we will be punished for any attempt to inhabit them. A Bangalore Mirror story shocked the country ...

Members of All India Students Association (AISA) shout slogans as they hold placards during a protest outside police headquarters in New Delhi, India, October 18, 2015. Dozens of AISA members on Sunday held a protest against the recent rapes in the capital, the demonstrators said. REUTERS/Anindito Mukherjee - RTS4YAL

Marking the anniversary of the 2012 Delhi rape, and the feminist movement it launched

What does it mean to mark anniversaries of violence? Which anniversaries do we mark, and how do we take these memories forward as movements?

On December 16th 2012, physical therapy intern Jyoti Singh (known as “Nirbhaya,” or “Fearless”) was brutally raped on a bus in Delhi. She subsequently died from her injuries.

The attack inspired nationwide protests and global rage, as Indians took to the streets to protest pervasive violence against women. As a result of the protests, an Indian government committee issued the comprehensive Justice Verma Committee Report, a sweeping indictment of patriarchal violence recommending, among other progressive mandates, the criminalization of marital rape and an end to military impunity in acts of sexual violence.

While subsequent laws did not fully implement ...

What does it mean to mark anniversaries of violence? Which anniversaries do we mark, and how do we take these memories forward as movements?

On December 16th 2012, physical therapy intern Jyoti Singh (known as “Nirbhaya,” ...