ilovemyboo

“I love my boo”

Last night on my home, I was delighted to see this ad on the subway. It’s a part of a campaign, launched yesterday by the NYC non-profit Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC). With messages like, “we’re proud of who we are and how we love” and “safer sex is one way we show our love,” the “I Love My Boo” campaign aims to raise the visibility of black and Latino gay men, especially those in relationships, and to address the homophobia that makes gay men more vulnerable to HIV infection. The ads will be appearing in 1000 subway cars and on 150 subway platforms in NYC this month.

According to the GMHC:

This campaign educates the community at-large, and promotes acceptance and understanding in a climate where gay men of color are seldom represented favorably in the media. “The I Love My Boo” campaign speaks to, and celebrates, gay men of color by highlighting their strengths and resiliencies.  Rather than only sexualizing gay relationships, with chiseled bodies and glossy imagery, the beauty of this campaign is that it features intimacy and focuses on what is possible for gay men of color as they express trust, respect and commitment for one another.

You can learn more about GMHC and the great work they do here.

New York, NY

Chloe Angyal is a journalist and scholar of popular culture from Sydney, Australia. She joined the Feministing team in 2009. Her writing about politics and popular culture has been published in The Atlantic, The Guardian, New York magazine, Reuters, The LA Times and many other outlets in the US, Australia, UK, and France. She makes regular appearances on radio and television in the US and Australia. She has an AB in Sociology from Princeton University and a PhD in Arts and Media from the University of New South Wales. Her academic work focuses on Hollywood romantic comedies; her doctoral thesis was about how the genre depicts gender, sex, and power, and grew out of a series she wrote for Feministing, the Feministing Rom Com Review. Chloe is a Senior Facilitator at The OpEd Project and a Senior Advisor to The Harry Potter Alliance. You can read more of her writing at chloesangyal.com

Chloe Angyal is a journalist and scholar of popular culture from Sydney, Australia.

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  • http://cabaretic.blogspot.com nazza

    One rarely sees depiction of gay men of color or of any minority very much. In the black community, I know part of it is because it can be so homophobic, to the point that everyone often knows whether a man is gay, but no one would dare talk about it publicly.

  • http://feministing.com/members/femmenist/ Caitlin

    does anyone know where we can get these posters?! i love them!!!