What We Missed.

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Due to the long weekend, we will resume posting on Tuesday. Have a fun safe labor day weekend!

Hilda Solis on working for the rights of workers, a reminder for this Labor day.

Atlanta is a good place for female “Gen Y” earners, aka, without child.

ABM Inc Industries is paying out 5.8 Million to women that were sexually harassed, groped and potentially raped on the job.

Turns out ladies nights are NOT sexist to men. Take that Hollander.

A study released yesterday by the Center for Reproductive Rights gives a state by state breakdown of how states are restricting reproductive rights.

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4 Comments

  1. Posted September 3, 2010 at 3:30 pm | Permalink

    Samhita’s rather gleeful reporting of the Hollander case seems a bit simplistic. For starters, the court didn’t rule that ladies nights are “not sexist,” they merely ruled that the state can’t exercise control over gender-based discounts.

    It’s hard to come out in support of Hollander’s position for the reasons he articulates (“The guys are paying for girls to party. I don’t think that’s fair,” Den Hollander said. “It’s a transfer of money from the wallets of guys to the pocketbooks of girls.). After all, by this rational, you couldn’t ever have, say, a senior-citizens discount, or a student discount.

    However, the question still stands: are ladies nights sexist? I’ve always assumed -and admittedly, this is only an assumption, since I have never worked in the industry- that the whole premise of ladies nights were to bring women into drinking establishments so as to facilitate the conventional hetero bar culture of men buying drinks for women in order to get into their pants. I noted that the comment section in the article reflects points of view consistent with this assumption, but I would also love to hear perspectives from people who’ve worked in that industry, since I can only speculate about the motivations and sexual politics of ladies night.

    This is a bit of a ramble, I just object to the idea that a court ruling can render something “not sexist,” and to the idea that this is necessarily a win for women and for feminism without further substantive debate.

  2. Posted September 3, 2010 at 11:29 pm | Permalink

    Regarding Ladies Nights, attracting a larger number of women serves a practical purpose: attracting more heterosexual men interested in meeting or at least seeing women. These women are essentially really low-paid workers, which can suit them well-enough if the “work” is still fun enough for the (reduced) cost they pay. And discrimination is legal if the criteria is a BFOQ. Ironically for Hollander, if he spent less time being a self-proclaimed “anti-feminist” and instead advocated for equal treatment of men and women in terms of how society regards their sexuality, these businesses could rely less on events such as Ladies Nights.

  3. Posted September 4, 2010 at 11:00 am | Permalink

    I don’t think we can conclude from the court decision that “ladies nights are NOT sexist to men”. All we can conclude is that the court states that the current laws do not apply to this case.

    I think any pricing scheme that charges one sex more than the other for identical goods or services is sexist. Examples that are frequently discussed are dry cleaning, where a woman is charged more for cleaning and pressing an oxford shirt than a man is, and personal care products, where the price for an identical product in a pinkified package is higher. These pricing differentials that disadvantage women are often criticized in feminist writings, including this blog.

    Ladies night does not differ substantially from these examples – the goods (admission to a club, beverages) are priced differently depending on sex. If any differential pricing for a good or service based on sex or gender is sexist, then ladies night is sexist.

  4. Posted September 4, 2010 at 6:25 pm | Permalink

    Interesting. In Ireland, “ladies’ nights” have, I think, been banned by the Equality Authority.
    (I’m not sure of the legal distinctions on this though, my Google-fu is failing me).

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