What We Missed

Kagan’s confirmation hearings finished up today. Just waiting on the final word…

Female athletes should view with skepticism the results from exercise studies that use only male subjects.
According to Guernica: “Jennifer Egan reinvents herself as a punk Proust, hippie Dos Passos, a rock-and-roll Faulkner who uses her mastery of multiple points of view to address the horrors of memory, perils of narcissism, and the evolution of PR in a tale that spans fifty years in just 272 pages.”
Dana Goldstein of the Daily Beast asks “Is Obama failing Congo?”
File this under science and technology gone way, way awry: prenatal “dex.”
A social history of the drink of choice, Diet Coke, of many a lady.
SXSW 2011 PanelPicker interface open for business. Go influence that shit.

and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.

7 Comments

  1. Bridgette
    Posted July 1, 2010 at 6:58 pm | Permalink

    “File this under science and technology gone way, way awry: prenatal ‘dex.’”
    No, file this under an attempt to eradicate lesbianism and feminism using a tratogenic steroid! While we are at it, file it under ‘unethical’, ‘immoral’, ‘patriarchal’, and a WHOLE bunch of other things!
    This is the article I wrote about it, and I had to restrain my language rather a lot when I did so.
    Doctors Using Birth Defect Inducing Drug To Try And Prevent Strong Women, Lesbians In The Womb

  2. MandyV
    Posted July 1, 2010 at 7:00 pm | Permalink

    Grown-Ups
    If you have a young daughter, the film might be a good gateway to discussing the portrayal of women on film. After all, if we censored what our kids watched based on sexism alone, they wouldn’t see much of anything at all. Better to watch it with them and talk about it.
    The Twilight Saga: Eclipse
    With Edward, and the Cullen Clan, Bella feels things she hasn’t felt before: real, strong, and capable. But as any card-carrying feminist knows, leaving your “natural” world, seeking alternatives, and disrupting the status quo is never easy, and never without doubt.

  3. ScienceAndTheCity
    Posted July 2, 2010 at 10:57 am | Permalink

    No kidding. This is disgusting. And definitely unethical and immoral.
    It’s not science and technology gone awry – it’s doctors gone awry. Any scientist or doctor worth her salt wouldn’t give a hormone to a pregnant woman without the thorough trial of that drug for safety and efficacy. Prescribing this hormone off-label is completely irresponsible and unethical. They’re not doing it the right way because clinical trials for this would never get approved, since the premise is completely bogus. It’s a “treatment” for something that isn’t a disease!
    I find it especially galling that the woman heading this study is one of the first female pediatric endocrinologists.

  4. Bridgette
    Posted July 2, 2010 at 11:26 am | Permalink

    Thank you. The original reason for giving this is a birth defect which can be fatal, but usually is not. If one manages a child’s diet properly, it is not fatal. Instead, they are giving a steroid that can- and does- cause even more problematic birth defects largely to make sure that these girls do not have enlarged clitorises. This is purely stupid since even a normally born woman can have a clitoris which is considered to be too large by the mythical standards of this society.
    This coming on top of the doctor who has been removing perfectly healthy clitoral tissues in order to make girls have ‘normal’ clitorises and using procedures which are, flatly, child abuse just tells me how bad the patriarchal rot has advanced of late.

  5. rhian
    Posted July 2, 2010 at 2:46 pm | Permalink

    I’m a little confused by your claims. What birth defects does dexamethasone cause?
    Also just wanted to point out–salt-wasting CAH cannot be managed with diet alone. But the dexamethasone doesn’t treat the salt wasting anyway.

  6. Bridgette
    Posted July 2, 2010 at 4:10 pm | Permalink

    If the ‘dex’ doesn’t cure the salt wasting at all, then it should be banned for this use since all it cures is little girls growing up with enlarged clitorises. The Time article that Miram linked to included a woman who said that her daughter still had those birth defects and others which are not associated with her normal AHS condition. The information I could find is that it caused increases in birth defects among lab rats. It did not specify what those birth defects were, but it is listed as a Class C Steroid, which means it is not suppose to be given to pregnant women, but there is not enough human trial data to determine any problems. It does pass through breast milk.
    They are conducting human experiments since this medication is not approved in order to cure a girl’s enlarged clitoris.

  7. Bridgette
    Posted July 2, 2010 at 5:05 pm | Permalink

    Sorry, I got my disorders out of order. This subject, along with the ‘gender studies’ being done out of it make me more than a little angry.

Feministing In Your Inbox

Sign up for our Newsletter to stay in touch with Feministing
and receive regular updates and exclusive content.

166 queries. 0.361 seconds