Mother of Many

This is a really beautiful short film praising midwives that’s being presented in Canada’s National Film Board competition, you must check it out. It may not be NSFW for some.

You can vote for the video here. (Click the “I like” button.) Via Babble.

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14 Comments

  1. newyorkred1
    Posted May 14, 2010 at 4:46 pm | Permalink

    I find this film actually really creepy… I can’t explain why, just something about it…
    Also, when you post videos, it’s really hard to watch them because of all the links on the side of the page. You can actually only see about half the video because your “related posts” links covers it up.

  2. johanna in dairyland
    Posted May 14, 2010 at 6:27 pm | Permalink

    Thank you for sharing this – it’s really beautiful and reminiscent of my experience with a midwife supported birth. It brought tears to my eyes.

  3. mke
    Posted May 14, 2010 at 11:31 pm | Permalink

    That is wonderful. Especially how it presents the work of midwives as just that — work!

  4. uberhausfrau
    Posted May 15, 2010 at 1:48 am | Permalink

    it’s south park birthing porn! (and by that i mean something pleasurable to watch or look at, like pictures of people’s plants is garden porn, or amish porn e.i. the lehman’s catalog. im sure most folks know that, just covering my bases.)
    also, i had to laugh at the labouring mama who rips off her nightgown. it’s so true!

  5. Sleepy
    Posted May 15, 2010 at 1:12 pm | Permalink

    I thought this video was great! It really captured my memory of what giving birth was like – the emotions, the sounds, etc.
    I wonder what I would have thought of it before I gave birth.

  6. Krista
    Posted May 15, 2010 at 6:12 pm | Permalink

    I don’t understand how this is praising midwives. And how do we know she’s a midwife and not a nurse? Or can you be both? I thought midwives also delivered at homes, but all the depicted scenes seemed to be in a hospital-like setting.
    Beautiful art and sound, though. :)
    And I agree with newyorkred1 that the links cover the video. I’m using Mozilla Firefox 3.6.3. I had to go to the website to view.

  7. thecheesegirl
    Posted May 16, 2010 at 12:45 am | Permalink

    Yeah. I want to be a midwife, and still I found something really off-putting about this video.

  8. R-Cop
    Posted May 16, 2010 at 5:31 pm | Permalink

    I think my favourite part is the sigh at around 5:14. As someone who has not given birth or witnessed a birth, I thought this was really powerful and moving. It didn’t glorify birth as a magical experience full of joy and love. It showed a messy, loud, difficult process and then, at the end, there was a baby!

  9. rhowan
    Posted May 16, 2010 at 10:13 pm | Permalink

    Krista said:“I don’t understand how this is praising midwives. And how do we know she’s a midwife and not a nurse?”
    At the end of the film the credits say
    “Inspired by my mum
    Pam Lazenby
    A Midwife from 1980-2008″

  10. Liz
    Posted May 17, 2010 at 12:39 am | Permalink

    I’ve never given birth (I’m not considering having children for another 10 years or so) but I thought this was an amazing film and it moved my heart. I’m so happy this was posted.

  11. uberhausfrau
    Posted May 17, 2010 at 8:44 am | Permalink

    the link says it’s about a UK midwife and in the UK midwifes do the majority of births, even in hospitals, if im remembering statistics correctly.

  12. Courtroom Mama
    Posted May 17, 2010 at 11:00 am | Permalink

    We know that she is a midwife because when she answers the telephone, she says “midwife speaking,” and also because she is the primary attendant. Most L&D nurses supervise the labor, and then assist in the delivery, which is primarily attended by a doctor (OB or Family Practice) or a midwife.
    [Note, the following is US-centric, since I’m not sure where you are] One can be a nurse and a midwife at the same time. They are called CNMs (certified nurse-midwives). It’s an advanced nursing degree with a specialty in midwifery. There are other midwives who are not nurses (CPMs, certified professional midwives), but it is rare that they deliver in hospitals. Midwives can practice everywhere, home, hospital, or birth center, depending on the state and their credentials. In countries other than the US (and it seems that this was made in the UK by the woman’s accent and the side of the car she drove on), most labor wards are primarily staffed by midwives. In fact, most births in uncomplicated pregnancies, regardless of the setting, are attended by midwives. Labor wards in countries other than the US commonly have some of the props you see, such as the ball to sit on, a tub to labor in, and other things that help in the management of an unmedicated labor, so their hospitals look a little more like birth centers than an American audience would be used to seeing. But the cross on the building makes me think it is a hospital.
    Hope that helps!

  13. queenofbirds.wordpress.com
    Posted May 17, 2010 at 2:59 pm | Permalink

    is it just me, or does the perspective on the actual birth part look like the baby is coming out occiput posterior?
    also, yes, midwives are the primary attendants at most births outside of the US, at home or in hospital.

  14. MelissaRose
    Posted May 17, 2010 at 10:21 pm | Permalink

    I’m glad I’m not the only one who noticed that the baby came out OP. Direct OP in fact. Makes me feel like less of a birth nerd.
    But I thought it, intentionally or unintentionally, showed the commitment midwives have to supporting mothers and families in normal, physiologic birth. OP labors and births are HARD, and support from provider(s) sometimes makes all the difference.

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