What we missed: change is good edition

TAPPED is doing a week long series on awesome, feminist organizations working on critical, domestic issues–spurred by my column this week on the need to balance domestic and international activism. Check it out.
Controversy in India over a proposed quota for female lawmakers.
Over at the Frisky, they’ve got the scoop on a preschool that has refused a student admissions based on gay parents. Damn it, Colorado.
I sensed some tension between Mo’Nique and Barbara Walters during Walters’ annual Academy Awards interview special. Mo’Nique, continuing in her trend of badassery, unabashedly talked about her open relationship, hairy legs, and incest experience.
The magazine that made your mom a feminist, Ms. of course, is now in blog form.

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6 Comments

  1. Rochelle
    Posted March 10, 2010 at 2:56 am | Permalink

    I completely agree that we need a balance. While so much needs to be done elsewhere, a lot still needs to be done at home. Particularly, I’m concerned with the lack of female role models in popular media. From postage stamps, to street names, to the Statues in Statuary Hall – women are so sorely underrepresented – which sends the wrong message to the girls and boys of our country.
    Feministing actually posted earlier about the campaign to get Ohio to select a woman for Statuary Hall – and I think that sort of increased visibility of notable women at home is really important for our children.
    The Ohio campaign for Statuary Hall was pretty successful so far – since the group’s efforts managed to get 3 women in the top 10, and a 4th just missed the cut as number 11.
    Ohio people can vote for any of the 3 women at a number of polling places: http://www.daytondailynews.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/dayton/ohiopolitics/entries/2010/03/03/sites_announced_for_public_vot.html
    There’s also a facebook group for the effort: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Put-a-Woman-in-Statuary-Hall/318933963335?ref=ts

  2. Tara K.
    Posted March 10, 2010 at 8:19 am | Permalink

    Oh, and I love this comment from the Mo’Nique link:
    “She was so disrespectful and dismissive that Barbara’s producer, Bill Geddie, had to step in and ask Mo’Nique’s husband, Sid [Hicks], why Mo was being so rude,” claims the source. “Bill has told people you won’t be seeing Mo on ‘The View’ again soon.”
    You know the shit’s getting real when the men (or the handlers) step in to negotiate control over the wild little ladies.

  3. Brianna G
    Posted March 10, 2010 at 11:28 am | Permalink

    I don’t buy the “We’ll lose half our seats” thing from Muslims in India. It’s not the Indian government’s fault that the Muslim communities aren’t willing to elect women. I do agree that this will probably lead to a lot of men putting their female relatives into office, while keeping them under their control. While laudable, it may be too much, too soon– considering the country still has a problem with women believing they are obligated to obey their husband.
    Perhaps they should make at proportionate amount of these seats delegated for women who are not of the higher classes, or limit how many women who have family members in politics can take these seats? I don’t know. What would solve that problem fairly, besides the long-term solutions of education and social change?

  4. Athenia
    Posted March 10, 2010 at 1:08 pm | Permalink

    re: Mo’Nique
    From watching the Oraph interview, I get the sense that Mo’Nique feels that interviews can be often quite silly/uncessarily dramatic–and she’s not going to play interviewer’s game. If she thinks a question is stupid or irrevelant, she’s going to call you out.

  5. aleks
    Posted March 11, 2010 at 7:22 am | Permalink

    Muslims in India consider themselves an oppressed political minority. Further adjustments to the balance of power have often led to bloodshed. Even if you’re objectively right that Muslims are In The Wrong here, a lot of lives can be lost when political sensibilities are offended. Sometimes reactionary views have to be overruled, but it’d be extremely unwise in light of past violence to ignore them.

  6. Rachael
    Posted March 11, 2010 at 12:45 pm | Permalink

    Those comments on the story about a Catholic school rejecting the child of lesbian parents crack me up.
    Yes, as a private school, they have a right to reject any child for any reason. And we have a right to call them out on such idiotic bigotry, and protest their decision. I don’t believe the article said anything about the government stepping in to force the church to accept that child.

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