Note to women smokers: Quit smoking.


If only you knew Betty, if only you knew…
This is a stark reminder: women smokers lose 14.5 years off their life span.
I’m going to disclose a little, shameful secret: I’m a smoker. Well, not your average pack-of-cigarettes-a-day smoker, but depending on my stress level, I can be a pack-of-cigarettes-a-week smoker. And I hate it. I’ve been smoking casually, socially, whatever you want to call it, for over 10 years.
But that “I’m a social smoker” excuse is a complete cop-out. I’m in the process of trying to quit, and if you’re a smoker, this is a great time to kick the gross-ass habit too. Reasons? Gee, let’s see…

  • Smoking is the main cause of lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death in women.
  • Since 1950, lung cancer deaths among women have increased more than 600 percent, according to ACOG.
  • Smoking significantly increases the risk of many other cancers in women, including breast, oral, pharynx, larynx, esophageal, pancreatic, kidney, bladder, uterine, and cervical cancers.
  • Women who smoke are twice as likely to develop coronary heart disease and 10 times more likely to die from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than nonsmokers.
  • Are there any former smokers out there who can share their quitting stories? I know I can use all the help I can get.

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    179 Comments

    1. meeneecat
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 12:25 am | Permalink

      I understand what your saying here. I also hate it when people say you should “do this” and “don’t do that”…”Drugs are bad” arguments. However, I think, in general the anti-smoking campaigns are just simply education campaigns. And they have been extremely effective. Because of the decline in smoking, we will have much fewer cases of cancer, lung disease, emphysema, etc. What I’m trying to say is that, while I understand your argument, I also consider the quit campaigns to be hugely beneficial to many many people. They are so beneficial in fact, that this outweighs any negatives brought up in your post.

    2. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 1:02 am | Permalink

      early death is not the worst part of it
      it’s the suffering it causes before that death
      and the irresponsible destruction of the environment
      and suffering for others it causes
      not to mention that it is paying the original slave owners descendants for slavery

    3. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 1:14 am | Permalink

      As an asthmatic who suffocated to death (1 min. 50 seconds pronounced before coming back) and has been intibated and unconscious for up to 12 days due to lack of O2 intake
      I gotta tell ya
      While it isn’t the only thing doing it- Your smoking is polluting the air and the ground. Your butts are everywhere and they are not going away any time soon. The pack itself, the plastic wrapper, the factories…To top it all off,
      you are funding the original slave owners and buying into your own slavery one pack at a time.
      And you ask what this is a feminist issue?
      Are you high?
      Virginia Slims ad high?
      Go tape your mouth around a coffee stir straw, tape your nose and go about your day with less air, see how your quality of life decreases when you can’t fucking breathe.
      While you’re at it -
      look up the stats on increased lung problems in our society, starting with the children exposed to smoke from family and neighbors.
      Quality of life is a feminist issue you have issues with.

    4. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 1:23 am | Permalink

      You have obviously not ever had an asthma attack or experienced the symptom of the emphysema you already have as a smoker.
      Quit before the suffering starts and enjoy good health.

    5. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 1:26 am | Permalink

      Be real and realizze how ridiculaous it is to defend smoking
      c’mon, it’s 2008, you don’t have to smoke to fit in be cool or be as liberated as a man (Virginia Slimes)
      You are not growing your own tobacco and if you are, please stop, cause the smoke is suffocating someone somewhere.

    6. deerly
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 1:26 am | Permalink

      I never said you didn’t have the right to smoke. You can go smoke your life away if that’s really what you want to do.
      As long as people make informed, educated decisions about what they put in their body I think they should be entitled to do so.
      It doesn’t mean I think you have the right to expose others to your cigarettes and that if this is your choice you have a responsibility to be courteous and keep others from breathing in your smoke. This is about their health, this is about common decency that people who have allergies, asthma, or just hate the smell/taste have the right to go about their lives without you forcing your choice on them.
      I hope you do roll your own cigarettes, I never assumed you didn’t, but if you DONT then you are supporting an industry that is doing ASTONISHING amounts of damage to our communities. You are giving money to an industry that is designed to create addiction, exploit the poor and spread disease and death.
      I can’t think of a comparable corporation that is so large and so powerful and created for such a damaging and hurtful purpose.
      Part of being a feminist, in my opinion, is to evaluate our choices from different perspectives. You can smoke if that is your choice, but it doesn’t mean that others should be subjected to that decision in their personal space or that the smoking industry and cigarettes aren’t specifically bad for women.

    7. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 1:31 am | Permalink

      I can’t speak for others, but, let this help you understand why I am against anything that leads to lung dis-ease
      http://metahara.livejournal.com/394176.html

    8. lyndorr
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 1:33 am | Permalink

      Yes, I read a pretty recent article that said it had been approved for sale so I wondered if anyone’s seen it there. Interesting fact: Depsite many studies not finding any link to oral cancer, the EU has banned the sale. They had to make an exception when Sweden joined the EU.
      People say it’s gross. Probably but isn’t smoking pretty gross when tried for the first time?

    9. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 1:35 am | Permalink

      Your comment was immature and defensive and it was met with a condescending comment because you are defending dis-ease and sound like an addict in worst form.

    10. lyndorr
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 1:41 am | Permalink

      Now that’s interesting. I’ve never read evidence that “less-harmful cigarettes” are actually less harmful. Even if they put slightly fewer chemicals into your body, they’re sold at a health-food store???

    11. Terabithia
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 4:56 am | Permalink

      Its more that they blow smoke out and then it drifts in your face or the wind blows it there. I didn’t think I was using “repeated” imagery of that– maybe once, with the peanut comment. But the fact is unless you’re in a wide open field or a closed off room away from anyone else, the smoke does blow into other people’s faces.

    12. Terabithia
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 5:01 am | Permalink

      Ok, I see where I said something about an exhaust pipe pointed in your face.
      What I’m referring to is not generally smokers walking right up to someone and blowing directly in their face– yeah, I don’t think that happens much and if it does its probably purposely meant to be rude. But what does happen is that you’er in some sort of area where people are standing around– a restaurant, some outdoor tables, an alleyway, whatever. And everyone’s heads are at roughly the same height, and someone is smoking a few feet away from you, and they might not mean to blow out the smoke directly at you, but its hard to avoid blowing it in the general direction of someone. And if they don’t, then the wind picks it up and it drifts over to you. I can definitely tell when I’m breathing smoke just when I walk by someone who’s smoking 5 feet away. Often I hold my breath so I won’t start coughing. I can also tell when I go into a hotel room if someone has ever smoked there before; sometimes we have to ask to change rooms even if it was supposed to be a nonsmoking room because the smell gives me a headache (my mom has the same thing, and she grew up with parents who smoked and used to love the smell of secondhand smoke).
      What I mean is smoke being exhaled in a way where its impossible for me not to noticeably breathe it in. Yes I realise we’re all probably breathing tiny bits of car exhuast all the time, but its generally pretty easy to avoid breathing it directly within a few feet of the back of a car. And I DO think we should be working on making cars less stinky, for sure.

    13. Terabithia
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 5:03 am | Permalink

      Ok, I see where I said something about an exhaust pipe pointed in your face.
      What I’m referring to is not generally smokers walking right up to someone and blowing directly in their face– yeah, I don’t think that happens much and if it does its probably purposely meant to be rude. But what does happen is that you’er in some sort of area where people are standing around– a restaurant, some outdoor tables, an alleyway, whatever. And everyone’s heads are at roughly the same height, and someone is smoking a few feet away from you, and they might not mean to blow out the smoke directly at you, but its hard to avoid blowing it in the general direction of someone. And if they don’t, then the wind picks it up and it drifts over to you. I can definitely tell when I’m breathing smoke just when I walk by someone who’s smoking 5 feet away. Often I hold my breath so I won’t start coughing. I can also tell when I go into a hotel room if someone has ever smoked there before; sometimes we have to ask to change rooms even if it was supposed to be a nonsmoking room because the smell gives me a headache (my mom has the same thing, and she grew up with parents who smoked and used to love the smell of secondhand smoke).
      What I mean is smoke being exhaled in a way where its impossible for me not to noticeably breathe it in. Yes I realise we’re all probably breathing tiny bits of car exhuast all the time, but its generally pretty easy to avoid breathing it directly within a few feet of the back of a car. And I DO think we should be working on making cars less stinky, for sure.
      I have a friend who smokes, and she knows I hate it so she tries not to smoke around me, but I can still smell it on her clothes a lot of the time. She insists she’s only a social smoker, butsometimes she still just HAS to smoke when we’re hanging out, and she always tries to stand downwind of me, but I still definitely smell it. And what about the other people on the street who are now downwind of her? Its very very hard to avoid the smoke going into someone’s face if you’re in any sort of public place.
      Why can’t people just eat/chew/inject/snort tobacco? Can they make a tobacco-laced drink or lollipop? Any of those things would likely be healthier than smoking anyway.

    14. William
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 7:07 am | Permalink

      Roy Castle famously died from the effects of second-hand smoke, while having never been a smoker.
      I grew up with his TV show “Record Breakers” in the 1980-90s, and I dare say most Brits in their 20s would recognise his name.

    15. Trixen
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 9:16 am | Permalink

      What I find so incredibly arrogant about this comment is the phrase, “I smoke because I like it.” Good for you. What I DON’T LIKE? Is having to walk to work surrounded by a toxic cloud of YOUR EFFING LUNG CANCER.
      How about that?
      Yes, I get angry. My Grandmother died of lung cancer after smoking for 50 years. My Grandfather died of emphysema after smoking for close to 70 years. One of my best friends gave her daughter massive lung problems from smoking in the house with her for 2 years. I remember the doctor shaking his head in disgust and saying, “No one should be smoking around this child. I hope you are proud of yourself.”
      I hate smoking. I hate everything about it. But what I hate most? Is smokers acting like it only affects them, so wah wah, let them do it if they want! No, it is NOT just your body. It is everyone’s bodies, and every time I walk to work, I have two choices:
      1) Hold my breath
      2) Inhale
      And it sucks. And it’s a choice, but an unavoidable one, and I am so sick of having to make it.

    16. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 11:39 am | Permalink

      may you join the ranks of those whose opinions are obnoxious, but, their fumes are not noxious.

    17. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 11:46 am | Permalink

      The problem with smoking is that you are not only “putting it in your body”, you are subjecting others and the environment in general to your poison of choice.
      I haven’t chosen it, so in the bizzare chance that you are ever in my presence, please don’t smoke around my lungs. Or my sons lungs. Or my mothers lungs. etc.
      etc.
      etc.

    18. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 11:51 am | Permalink

      Vanessa,
      Thanks for stopping the habit.
      Here is a small list of things that have worked for people I know, who stopped smoking:
      Pranayama for as many minutes as smoking a cigarette takes
      Knitting
      Keeping a bottle of water with you at all times for drinking
      Using a straw to drink water
      sketching
      writing
      bead work
      Yoga
      crunches
      singing
      Mantra’s that remind:
      realizing that you are not a smoker. You are too intelligent and too invested in your good health to be a smoker at this time. It served a purpose at some point in your life, but, it was like an abusive partner and must be let go of now.
      You are not a smoker. You are not going to pay for self abuse in such a blatantly obvious way ever again.
      Good luck and thank you.

    19. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 12:00 pm | Permalink

      I don’t have lung cancer and it hasn’t been proven that the fact that my mother smoked during her pregnancy with me (and not my siblings) and around me (and not my siblings) caused me to have asthma (and not my siblings).
      But,
      it is very obvious that cigarette smoking causes my lungs problems in the very moment that they are exposed to them.
      That in turn hurts my mind and spirit. It hurts.
      It actually hurts to not be able to breathe well. Sadly, you’ll understand what I am talking about soon enough. I wouldn’t wish suffocating on my worst enemy.
      I realize that my lungs and my health are not your problem. I just want you to have that information and realize that the asthma rate (regardless of cause) has risen 500% since my birth 42.8 years ago in this country.

    20. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 12:17 pm | Permalink

      last comment on this:
      Smoking cigarettes is an asshole thing to do.

    21. tessa
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 12:45 pm | Permalink

      Gopher, I have an anxiety disorder, too, and used cigarettes for a long time to avoid/stop panic attacks. When I decided to quit, I went to one of those smoking cessation courses run by a nurse and she told me something very interesting: It isn’t the cigarette that makes you less anxious. It is the breathing.
      Smoking makes you take deep breaths in and controlled ones out. The only problem is that you are taking in toxic smoke while doing it. Once you quit that and get over the physical aspect of the addiction, you can still do the breathing to head off or fix a panic attack. I found it useful to learn Pranayama (yoga breathing), but it certainly isn’t necessary.
      So that would be my first bit of if-you-want-to-stop advice for Vanessa, too. The second is choose a date in the future, and finish all of your cigarettes the day before. Wake up as a non-smoker (I stopped smoking on Thanksgiving four years ago). Third is much more practical – if you smoke in your house, throw away all ashtrays and do a complete cleaning of your house. If you smoke in your car, get it detailed. I found that it was much more difficult to start up again when I knew that I would be ruining something (a clean house/car) that it took me time or money to get. Good luck!

    22. Emily
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 2:25 pm | Permalink

      I’ve seen allot of comments insulting smokers: calling them stinky, laughing at them for their added medical risks (WTF?!), saying they are a harm to everyone else (some said this is true even if they aren’t smoking around anyone else but still have stinky cloths), and basically treating smokers like naughty children.
      I think this is because some people taking their feelings on those who smoke around others where they are trapped (forced to work in smoky bars, children inside homes, other indoor areas) and generalizing it to all smokers. I live in California where it is illegal to smoke in a workplace (including restaurants, bars, etc.). I think this is an awesome law because no one should be forced to take unnecessary health risks at their place of work. This means that most smokers in Cali don’t hurt anyone with their smoke cause they have to do it outside or in their own homes. So why all the hostility? I don’t smoke but I get really tired of people trying to kick smokers out of the planet.
      At my university, they are trying to make the entire campus smoke-free, why? Smokers already can’t smoke in classrooms (good) and have to stand twenty feet away from any door (also good), so why try and kick them off the entire campus? That sounds unreasonable and kinda ridiculous.
      Anyway, if you want to insult someone who smokes next to you in an enclosed area against your will, fine. But I think we should not assume every smoker does that and we should treat smokers with the same respect and courtesy that we treat everyone else with on this site.

    23. PullTaffy
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 3:22 pm | Permalink

      Here’s the thing, I understand that you want your right to smoke. You have a choice about when and where you light up, and I have to give you kudos for being a relatively considerate smoker. But- my mother doesn’t have a CHOICE about having copd and asthma. She also doesn’t have a CHOICE about walking down a street on her way to work or out shopping or living her life. I also think that she should have the freedom to eat in restaurants with friends. She can’t be around smoke. Ever. You can smoke when you leave a bar, but she can’t stop having health problems when she enters it.

    24. A male
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 3:48 pm | Permalink

      I agree with this poster’s comments:
      “As long as people make informed, educated decisions about what they put in their body I think they should be entitled to do so.”
      “It doesn’t mean I think you have the right to expose others to your cigarettes and that if this is your choice you have a responsibility to be courteous and keep others from breathing in your smoke. This is about their health, this is about common decency that people who have allergies, asthma, or just hate the smell/taste have the right to go about their lives without you forcing your choice on them.”
      I also agree with this poster’s comments:
      “Anyway, if you want to insult someone who smokes next to you in an enclosed area against your will, fine. But I think we should not assume every smoker does that and we should treat smokers with the same respect and courtesy that we treat everyone else with on this site.”
      I do not smoke. I do not like smoke. I detest the smell of stale smoke in my clothes, or in upholstery and carpets. As someone interested in health, I am well aware of the health risks involved in smoking. But they are risks. I cannot point at any young person, even as a nurse, and say, “you ARE going to develop cancer” or “you WILL have a low birth weight baby” or “you ARE cutting x amount of time from your lifespan.” I can’t even say, “YOU caused my dad’s cancer,” because if people could, there would be serious money to be made off smokers, who unlike tobacco companies, do not have personal multimillion dollar legal defense teams.
      Why not? Because they are individuals, and even among smokers there are other factors, such as genetics and other aspects of lifestyle that determine risk. Other people, like my grandfather, can smoke a harsh brand of cigarettes and die at 90 and beyond, when men of his generation had an average life expectancy in the mid 40s.
      Otherwise, I consider smoking for the average person who can respect others, to be akin to eating foods containing high amounts of sodium, cholesterol or “bad” fats; using motor vehicles instead of human power, or sitting at a desk instead of doing manual labor 12 hours a day. You don’t want to get into an argument about how people are responsible for damaging their own health, or that of others. Modern living, of which smoking is just one aspect (and in decline), has done quite enough detriment to health and the environment.

    25. Terabithia
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 3:55 pm | Permalink

      Laughing at people for medical risks is in poor taste, I agree. But is it an insult to say someone smells bad if they DO? If you don’t want to smell bad, don’t smoke, but don’t expect people to pretend you don’t smell. (And that’s a general you, I saw that the person I’m replying to said they don’t smoke).
      >some said this is true even if they aren’t smoking around anyone else but still have stinky cloths
      For the record, this can be true. Its not likely in all situations, but I know someone who definitely made his 2 year old daughter sick from smoke even though he only smoked outside away from her. She had lung problems and coughing just from breathing the smoke particles from his clothes. Very good motivation for him to finally quit.
      Plus, I think a lot of people were saying smokers still smell like smoke even if they aren’t smoking right near you, and that is true whether or not its a health risk.

    26. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 6:37 pm | Permalink

      It’s hard for those of us who understand the importance of breathing and how it affects quality of life to be patient with people who take their breath for granted. Why someone would choose a habit that destroys ones ability to breathe, a little bit at a time usually, is worthy of feminist discourse. Do you hate yourself? Do you give in to the Virginia Slim ads? What motivates that self destruction?
      On a site that speaks of INFORMED choice, it seems they don’t really have a clue.
      You’ve seen your mother suffer and I personally have suffered, but they are clueless.
      I’ll bet none have ever tried the breathing through a coffee stir straw and nothing else for even 1 full minute and yet, they claim knowledge and full consenting choice.
      People who smoke aren’t making an informed choice. or if they are, they are in deep denial, trying to prove some bizarre point or just not that bright.

    27. Cicada Nymph
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 6:45 pm | Permalink

      While I agree that the whole “war on drugs” is ridiculous and that marijuana can have some health/pain benefits I am not a big fan. I have seen some really negative changes in people after they started smoking weed and though I can’t prove the drug caused the changes I believe it did. I also think that it is more addictive than has been recognized and that the weed people are smoking now is very different than the weed people smoked in the 60′s. I also know people who have smoked weed that had other drugs mixed into it and who had not been told and had very bad reactions and many people have had paranoid experiences caused by just regular weed, so I wouldn’t state that weed is better than cigarettes. Weed has also been found to damage lungs, by the way. Because weed is illegal there is a risk involved in using it, because of that risk you can’t use it in the kind of social situations you could cigarettes, and the stigma attached to it means if your boss or coworkers or mother in law catches a whiff you could have a tough time ahead. Oh, and since it also can impair your ability to drive and to do certain jobs it does not have as wide of a range of times that you can do it. I think everyone just needs to do some research and than make their own decision about if using drugs is worth it to them, and if so what drugs they will use.

    28. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 6:51 pm | Permalink

      A smokers risk to self is not the only risk to health involved in smoking tobacco and supporting the tobacco industry.
      If my next door neighbor was eating high sodium foods, I would not have to increase my asthma meds or move in order to breathe.
      He would not be affecting my children’s health as individuals.
      Yes, it’s true that what one does can affect the whole in a butterfly effect way, but, smoking is more direct than that.
      I do want to get into a conversation about it.
      I do think it should be easier to ride bikes and have solar wind and electric power instead of gasoline.
      Yes, let’s talk about it as feminists who are bent on improving quality of life.

    29. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 8:18 pm | Permalink

      I have said in numerous, numerous comments elsewhere in this thread (I think some maybe even to you directly?) that I always take the utmost care to make sure I am not bothering those around me, and that I absolutely respect the rights of others not to have to breathe secondhand smoke if they do not wish to. Frankly, I still don’t understand where you guys are all getting this idea of the Evil Aggressive Smoker (see also comments about “blowing smoke in your face” above) from, and why you are assuming that all smokers are like that.

    30. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 8:23 pm | Permalink

      Why can’t I just have a cigarette, say, in the middle of a gigantic field somewhere where it’s windy and far away from you? I am not the cause of all your problems and I don’t appreciate being called an “asshole” just because I am some anonymous person who has made different choices from you.

    31. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 8:28 pm | Permalink

      I have said numerous, numerous, head-spinningly numerous times here that I never ever smoke when I think it will be a nuisance to those around me. I definitely never smoke in front of children, even when outside. I take other people’s desires very seriously. However, amazingly enough, I *do* actually have some amount of privacy on occasion, and/or I am actually outdoors with a decent radius of space around me, and/or I am actually among other smokers, so just because I smoke on occasion doesn’t mean I’m running up to your child and shotgunning my cigarette into their lungs. Jeez.

    32. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 8:32 pm | Permalink

      Thank you.

    33. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 8:37 pm | Permalink

      I didn’t find smoking “gross” exactly, but I did find it, I don’t know, weird. Now, I find a lot of mass produced cigarettes “gross” because after switching to additive-free tobacco, I can really taste the chemicals — it tastes like inhaling exhaust fumes or something.

    34. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 8:40 pm | Permalink

      For the record, I am all in favor of a world where anyone with health problems never has to be in a situation where they are aggravated by cigarette smoke.

    35. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 8:44 pm | Permalink

      This is not merely a rhetorical question: what’s it to you if I smoke? Really?

    36. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 8:49 pm | Permalink

      I remember seeing a couple of “health food” (i.e. hippie grocery/convenience store) places years ago sell bidis, and I remember some of my hippie-ish friends thinking that they were “healthier” due to being “natural” or some such, but as far as I know they’re actually worse for you…

    37. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 8:55 pm | Permalink

      If you’re going to insult me numerous times in one thread without even waiting for me to respond, as much as even making a vague passive-aggressive post on your LJ to the effect that I’m an “asshole” after linking me to it, the least you can do is explain why you think all these terrible things about a stranger just because she wants to be able to smoke a cigarette now and again, instead of basically just calling me names.

    38. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 9:01 pm | Permalink

      I am not the smokers you hate. I am just a smoker, and I don’t force my smoke on other people (and neither do most smokers, in my experience). I’ve talked about this numerous times elsewhere in this thread. I take your right not to have to breathe in secondhand smoke very seriously, which is why I have never ever lit up a cigarette next to you (you know, aside from the whole matter of you having never met me and all).

    39. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 9:10 pm | Permalink

      Oh, it’s not that you’re using “repeated” imagery, it’s just something I’ve seen a lot of times, even within this thread maybe 4 or 5 times, so it seemed like it might be sort of a common image and I was curious what was going on with it.

    40. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 9:23 pm | Permalink

      I consider smoking for the average person who can respect others, to be akin to eating foods containing high amounts of sodium, cholesterol or “bad” fats; using motor vehicles instead of human power, or sitting at a desk instead of doing manual labor 12 hours a day… Modern living, of which smoking is just one aspect (and in decline), has done quite enough detriment to health and the environment.
      I am totally with you there. For the record, I do consider my smoking a bad habit, it’s obviously bad for my health, etc etc. Hilariously enough, besides being a smoker, I am also a vegetarian who doesn’t own a car, rides a bike, moves around a fair amount during the day, doesn’t work for a giant corporation, lives in a very densely populated area, buys “greener” cleaning products, etc etc, who rarely drinks and never does drugs. I’m not saying this makes smoking any less bad for me or something, but it’s not like all I am is A Smoker who doesn’t have a bunch of other stuff going on…

    41. nightingale
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 9:50 pm | Permalink

      If you can, they make some really good drugs specifically for anxiety. They’ll be cheaper in the long run.

    42. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 9:52 pm | Permalink

      Your smoke is unnecessary pollution.
      Less necessary than transpo (which we hope to make less noxious). It isn’t the only one, but, we’re not defending other pollutants here and now, are we?
      It’s toxic shit for what purpose exactly?
      What is the reasoning behind the ” informed choice”
      you claim to be making?
      When I am on prednisone and when I was pregnant I could smell it from blocks away.
      Your position wreaks from a mile away.
      You wont win a point with me on this – I have suffocated, my choice to not smoke is informed.
      In this day and age, with the info available and the experiments with breathing and the knowledge of how marketing and conditioning work, how every dollar spent is a statement for something-
      Smoking cigarettes is an asshole thing to do.
      When you stop, if you stop while you are still conscious, you can look back and say, “Wow, that was an asshole thing to do”.

    43. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 9:57 pm | Permalink

      You are polluting the air we share. You are supporting a company that markets more of the same, so that more people will pollute the air we share.
      It’s useless pollution for what?
      and please stop saying it’s an informed choice if you choose not to believe the information, you are making an ignorant choice or one based in denial.
      You bought the marketing over the science and are defending that here.

    44. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 10:01 pm | Permalink

      As an aside –
      From the tone of their posts, I pictured snark as a male.
      ??? Hmm…

    45. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 10:05 pm | Permalink

      Ah the image of the last 3 fires set by cigarettes in California, during the Santa Ana’s just came to mind.
      Seriously, I think you (the general you) are acting like an ass every time you light up.
      I wish you the best lung health possible and I hope you wont ever have to experience the humiliation of being dependent on family, friends and the gov.
      because you can’t breathe well enough to wipe your own ass.
      I breathe well now (thanks to new meds, alt. healing modalities and air filters) and can work consistently.
      I cherish each breath. Not one is taken for granted.
      You do not have the information I have.
      If you’re interested in learning more, really going there, stop by my site.
      I have exercises that can help you gain understanding.

    46. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 10:08 pm | Permalink

      Wow. I am not trying to make you smoke or anything, and I do recognize it as a less than ideal situation. However, I have my priorities, and you have yours. I think calling me an asshole for it is out of line.
      By the way, if you are so terribly sensitive to air pollutants, how in the world did you live in NOLA for a while without, you know, dying? (Yes, I did actually bother to read a little of your LJ after you linked me there, especially the NOLA posts, since it’s where I grew up).

    47. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 10:09 pm | Permalink

      read the comments there and be enlightened.
      You don’t know me.
      It’s an asshole behavior.
      I don’t know you, but, i know asshole behavior and smoking, then defending it to top it off -
      is asshole behavior.
      I’m sure you think the same about me and that’s fine.
      I’ve been know to be an asshole.
      Let’s not defend asshole behavior though.

    48. Hara
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 10:14 pm | Permalink

      We have all been a hypocrite at one time or another. It’s silly to defend hypocrisy when it’s pointed out.
      You’ve gotta admit it doesn’t fit with the work towards less toxic living.
      Marketing wins? Really? It does not have to.

    49. nightingale
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 10:32 pm | Permalink

      This is the first of your comments I’ve read that I agree with.
      I choose to eat more than I need to. Part of it is habit, part of it is laziness, part of it is anxiety, and part of it is because I really like junk food. And most people here would defend my right to make that decision. We’re all adults, and we can make the decision to smoke and overeat and be fat, and no one is a bad person for having a vice, even if it means they risk disease. More than that, there’s a big difference between smoking in general, and the kind of smoking that can hurt others, and I hate seeing the two used interchangeably. Life is for living, and if you don’t enjoy things that potentially damage your health, that’s cool and your right to not partake in them. But if you do, you’re not a bad person, not stupid, and not an asshole.
      I’d expect a bunch of feminists to be less judgmental.

    50. idiolect
      Posted November 30, 2008 at 10:43 pm | Permalink

      Thank you, that is basically where I’m coming from as well. If you don’t mind, I’d be curious to know what about my other comments you might not’ve agreed with (if this is the first one)? I’m honestly curious, and I don’t feel like very many people have really articulated their objections to my posts very coherently, and I really do want to get a better understanding of where everyone else is coming from if I can.

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