Because why should young women have all that objectification fun!

Attention women over 35! Did you think that your days of desperately trying to fit in with unrealistic beauty standards were over? Guess again! The new TV show “She’s Got the Look” gives women of all ages the chance to feel insecure and unworthy!

When will the madness stop?

and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.

25 Comments

  1. Destra
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 8:44 am | Permalink

    When I first heard about this show I was excited that they were going to feature women of age as natural beauties. But these women are not good examples of an aged woman. They all look like they could be 30.

  2. Posted May 30, 2008 at 8:46 am | Permalink

    It seems one is never to old to be exploited by the beauty and cosmetics industry. I would also like to know that if this show is about modeling why is it necessary to question the sexuality of these women? The two are not related. This is all about conformity, while it is trying to sell itself as progressive.

  3. Posted May 30, 2008 at 9:07 am | Permalink

    Nice. Never too young nor too for people to make you feel like crap for the way you look.
    Speaking of feeling like crap, I just blogged about the latest attempt on anti-abortion legislation. this time in Colorado. Check it out.

  4. Noah
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 9:38 am | Permalink

    This is arguably ground zero for the fight to end sexism. What are we telling out daughters when we pass this crap off as nothing more than a natural part of the cultural landscape?
    When mothers are imbued in the milieu of beauty, they teach our girls that they, too, need to become sex bait to fulfill their primordial urge to procreate or to attract a member of the opposite sex. And, sadly, the economy would collapse if the beauty industry dried up too quickly.
    And when fathers immerse themselves, or even dabble, in the porn culture, they teach our girls, and our boys, that a woman’s value is her body. And by treating women as less than human, men become less then human.
    This is the most blatant area of sexism in our modern culture, and we need to speak up about it.

  5. biancamarisa
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 10:09 am | Permalink

    Wow. Ok. Well. The crew at feministing could just take the rest of the day off. Two thoughts: (1)If this show fails, it will be said it was because “nobody wants to watch aging women try to be models,” and (2)it exposes how the pressure to be validated does not discriminate by age.

  6. mathgoddess
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 10:15 am | Permalink

    Notice the two women who were asked about their jobs: The Pole Dancer and The Childcare Worker. Not to diminish these jobs, but where are The Doctor, The Engineer, The Businesswoman? On all of these “reality” shows (I’m thinking particularly of Fear Factor here), they seem to carefully select women whose jobs are stereotypically “feminine” enough not to offend the public’s delicate sexist sensibilities. Not that I would want to see the Doctor, Engineer, or Businesswoman humiliated on crap TV like this, but as long as people watch it, they might as well see *some* type of diversity.
    Oh, and I really dug the token “some of my best models are black lesbians!”

  7. LogrusZed
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 10:22 am | Permalink

    mathgoddess:
    I think they had to ask the childcare provider about her job because they took one look at her nails and had to wonder what kind of job someone with claws could possibly have.

  8. LogrusZed
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 10:29 am | Permalink

    This show has me kind of conflicted, because while I don’t think that beauty should be as valued as it is the fact is it is still valued and people do assume that age is it’s antithesis. I do wish that something could come along that would shake up a lot of preconceptions people have about age and attractiveness.
    Maybe I’ve just seen “Searching For Debra Winger” too many times.

  9. rhowan
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 10:38 am | Permalink

    mathgoddess: Notice the two women who were asked about their jobs: The Pole Dancer and The Childcare Worker. Not to diminish these jobs, but where are The Doctor, The Engineer, The Businesswoman?
    Probably the Doctors, Engineers and Business women have more important and lucrative things to do with their time than try for a shot at short-lived fame and money on a reality tv show? Just a guess. :)

  10. mathgoddess
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 10:46 am | Permalink

    rhowan-
    I actually thought about that. But I’m assuming that most women on the show had better (though maybe not quite as high-paying) things to do). Working with children, for example. Also, I can’t help but imagine that if a doctor/lawyer/… were on this type of show, they would take care NOT to ask about her job (or at least make sure she was single and mock her about her lack of a fella). Just a hunch.

  11. Posted May 30, 2008 at 10:57 am | Permalink

    “This show has me kind of conflicted, because while I don’t think that beauty should be as valued as it is the fact is it is still valued and people do assume that age is it’s antithesis. I do wish that something could come along that would shake up a lot of preconceptions people have about age and attractiveness.”
    But this show doesn’t do that, because it still equates “beauty” with “looking younger than you are”. Like Destra said, these women all look 30. If there was a woman on there who looked her age, they would not call her beautiful, even if she was. This show does the exact opposite of what it’s trying to make you think it’s doing.

  12. Andrew
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 11:00 am | Permalink

    Has anyone seen a British program called “How to look good nakid”? It is the exact opposite to this kind of show, or the dreaded “the swan” show. They take the guest aside and with out any excersize prescribed, no changes in diet and on surgery, the host shows her that she really is beautiful as she is! It’s the most feminist show ever! The host (Gok-something) tries to build up their self esteem in cleaver little ways.
    For example he has a line up of women (who are in order of size) and asks the guest to put herself in the line where she belongs… when the guest does so they always get it wrong by about three or four sizes, because she has been convinced that she is less apealing than she really is.
    It is a really positive and enriching show, I’m a guy and I like it. Look for it on youtube. Sorry that this seems like an ad but I don’t think that show gets enough credit.

  13. Andrew
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 11:04 am | Permalink

    Sorry “How to look good naked”.

  14. identity
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 11:08 am | Permalink

    Well, the fact that they’re on the show pretty directly means they didn’t have anything better to do (at least from their own estimation of their life). Even if they were working with children, if they agreed to be on the show then they felt that their interests were better served by being on the show.
    Having a lawyer/doctor/any kind of high-payed professional on a reality TV show is such a novelty that I think they might play it up, not play it down. Doing so wouldn’t preclude a bias presentation (“she was a successful lawyer, but decided that it was more important that people thought she looked pretty…”, etc), but I think it’s more likely.

  15. rhowan
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 11:14 am | Permalink

    mathgoddess: ‘though maybe not quite as high-paying”
    Yeah, that’s why I emphasized lucrative. If I were making $100,000+ a year in a successful professional career I wouldn’t bother (or risk) taking time off to be on a reality tv show where the only reward is a modeling contract.
    If I was making $11 an hour as a day-care worker though it might be worth it.

  16. mathgoddess
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 11:25 am | Permalink

    Oh wow, missed the italics. Sorry bout that.

  17. Posted May 30, 2008 at 11:35 am | Permalink

    Are there any reality TV shows with more than one female judge? Are there any where the female judge is not the token “nice one?” (I don’t watch many of them, so I ask before I make an ass of myself claiming it as another sexist trend, but it does seem a little fishy.)

  18. Posted May 30, 2008 at 11:36 am | Permalink

    Are there any reality TV shows with more than one female judge? Are there any where the female judge is not the token “nice one?” (I don’t watch many of them, so I ask before I make an ass of myself claiming it as another sexist trend, but it does seem a little fishy.)

  19. Posted May 30, 2008 at 11:59 am | Permalink

    All of these shows really annoy me. I just don’t get it– when will this become “old”? Can’t people stop watching this crap so it can stop being made in the first place?!

  20. Voila
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 12:09 pm | Permalink

    Project Runway had 2 female judges and a male with random guest judges every week. The judges were all trying to be nice but honest at the same time, so there was none of that unnecessary nastiness, a la Simon Cowell. Still part of the beauty culture, but certainly less focus on women’s beauty and more focus on the clothes-makers’ skills, so it was more enjoyable overall. Hope that helps, Sidewriter.

  21. everybodyever
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 1:18 pm | Permalink

    Andrew, you said:
    For example he has a line up of women (who are in order of size) and asks the guest to put herself in the line where she belongs… when the guest does so they always get it wrong by about three or four sizes, because she has been convinced that she is less apealing [sic] than she really is.
    Let me make an assumption here and guess that by “less appealing” you mean “fatter,” e.g., the woman lines up between women larger than she actually is. If that’s the case, then how does this show do anything other than remind women that, congrats!, they’re not as fat as they think they are? The emphasis is still on the desireability of thinness, isn’t it?

  22. FrumiousB
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 3:27 pm | Permalink

    If there was a woman on there who looked her age, they would not call her beautiful, even if she was.
    Just what does a woman of 35 look like? Some 35 yr old women have lots of wrinkles, some have very few, some have saggy triceps, some have toned triceps, some have stretch marks, some don’t.. there are as many ways to look 35 as there are women who are 35. I would be more comfortable if criticisms of the show centered on the narrow view of acceptable beauty for a 35 yr old woman rather than on claims that these women don’t look their age. These women do look their age because they are their age and they look how they look.

  23. Kaylee
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

    Andrew,
    The show “How to Look Good Naked” aired for awhile on Lifetime with Carson from Queer Eye for the Straight Guy hosting it. I thought it was a very good show. My only beef with it was that it triggered every single one of my friends with body image issues – not because of the show doing anything wrong, per-say, but because every single one of my friends said the same thing “oh, I would never subject myself to that.” Even though the show was very therapeutic to the women on it.
    I thought the line-up of women on the the show was an interesting idea, because it showed the make-over-ee that she really did have an unrealistic opinion of herself that she needed to reign in. Many of us view ourselves far more harshly than many other people perceive us and it really is damaging to our own sense of self. And I loved that the vast majority of women on that show looked fantastic, and had normal, curvy women’s bodies.
    Re: “She’s Got the Look.” Meh. It’s just another faux modeling wannabe show that I won’t watch. Unless every other channel has a test pattern, it’s storming outside and I’ve read every book, magazine, ezine and blog I can find. I feel sorry for the women on the show and their families, more than anything. Public humiliation is bad enough; it’s worse when strangers recognize you in public everywhere you go. Reality shows, in general, are getting old.

  24. Andrew
    Posted May 30, 2008 at 4:38 pm | Permalink

    @Everybodyever
    Hey, it was my choice to use the words “less appealing”. I think those were the wrong ones, the aim of the line up is to show the guest that they have a distorted view of their bodies, but at no stage is that they should loose weight. Infact the host keeps reinforcing that they are stunning – full stop. No, “see you really are thin!” , so I don’t think the british version is reinforcing traditional body images, but the host certainly doesn’t go to the root of the problem – advertising and beauty industries and all the rest.

  25. Posted May 30, 2008 at 6:29 pm | Permalink

    My own mom is really beautiful still. I’ve always reassured myself that I’ll look young well into my forties, but then again I’m a neurotic mess compared to her.
    I look a lot like her, but she’s taller than me, with higher cheekbones and darker hair. I’ve always been jealous. ;p

Feministing In Your Inbox

Sign up for our Newsletter to stay in touch with Feministing
and receive regular updates and exclusive content.

200 queries. 0.935 seconds