Fake boobs: Dangerous to your mental health?

New research shows women who have had breast implants are three times as likely to commit suicide. While the article doesn’t include what percentage of women who get implants have pre-existing mental health issues, it does mention that,

Previous studies have shown that as many as 15% of plastic surgery patients have body dysmorphic disorder, a condition marked by severe distress over minor physical flaws. People with the disorder have a higher rate of suicidal thoughts and rarely improve after surgery.

Lest I sound like a forced-pregnancy advocate screeching about so-called “post-abortion syndrome,” I have to say that the implants themselves are pretty meaningless here. It’s a question of the mental health status of women who choose to get breast implants. Realizing this, some plastic surgeons are calling for more pre-augmentation mental-health screenings. (My question: Would they really tell a woman with severe depression that she couldn’t have D-cups? Maybe. Maybe not.) Other surgeons don’t seem concerned, saying that, because the research was conducted between 1965 and 1993, the situation today is much brighter for the silicone-boobed:

Researchers said the results may have limited applicability to women today because breast augmentation is more acceptable than it was 40 years ago.

Do they actually mean to suggest that the women in the study were suicidal because, in previous decades, society was not accepting of their silicone-enhanced breasts? I’d argue that today there is even more social pressure to look perfect than there was 40 years ago. And as plastic surgery becomes more socially acceptable, women with mental-health issues (and problems like body-dysmorphic disorder) may be under even more pressure to get breast augmentations. Therefore this problem is not going away.
Does this mean it’s time for the Love Your Body movement to take a cue from the anti-choice movement and start drumming up lots of biased research about so-called “post-boob-job syndrome”? Er, probably not…
Thanks to Erin for the link.

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39 Comments

  1. Vervain
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 1:02 pm | Permalink

    This Just In:
    Breast Implants Not A Cure For Mental Illness!
    Well, duh. What exactly was this research expected to reveal?
    That big boobies are the key to universal bliss?
    In Other News:
    Strange Connection Discovered Between Lack of Heartbeat and Death!

  2. Posted August 8, 2007 at 1:17 pm | Permalink

    I don’t think you’re getting your summary quite right….

    Researchers said the results may have limited applicability to women today because breast augmentation is more acceptable than it was 40 years ago.

    Do they actually mean to suggest that the women in the study were suicidal because, in previous decades, society was not accepting of their silicone-enhanced breasts? I’d argue that today there is even more social pressure to look perfect than there was 40 years ago. And as plastic surgery becomes more socially acceptable, women with mental-health issues (and problems like body-dysmorphic disorder) may be under even more pressure to get breast augmentations. Therefore this problem is not going away.

    I think the suggestion would work more like this:
    Women 40 years ago faced pressure to change their bodies. However, if they DID change their bodies (in response to said pressure) then all was not well: the mere fact of getting breast enhancements was in and of itself enough to become “not socially acceptable”. That created a catch-22; you can’t live with it, and you can’t fix it.
    Now (or so I suspect the theory goes) the women have similar body issues, if not even more of them. However, the catch-22 is reduced: it’s now completely acceptable (and very common) to have a variety of plastic surgery. So women who have similar body issues are now (in theory, at least) not subject to the same stigma they once experienced, which stigma was based on the fact of surgery, not the underlying body issue.
    I assume the researchers believe that the catch-22 was the cause of post-surgical suicides.
    I do not know enough about this to have an opinion on whether the theory is correct. But I’ve read enough papers of this type to believe that my summary of the theory is accurate. I’m merely trying to help explain it.

  3. kissmypineapple
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 1:23 pm | Permalink

    Sailorman, I don’t mean to be nitpicky, but I object to your use of the term “fix it.” It makes it sound as though small breasts make a woman broken, or that small breasts is truly a problem that ought be fixed. That’s exactly the message women get all the time. If your body is not the cultural ideal, it’s not just different, it’s wrong.

  4. kat
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 1:28 pm | Permalink

    Or, perhaps, because the surgery was somewhat taboo, in the past only women with the most severe body image issues were likely to have it done.
    Now women with less severe body image issues may be getting it done.

  5. SarahMC
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 2:29 pm | Permalink

    It’s pretty obvious to me that women who get boob jobs TEND to be less mentally healthy than women who don’t get boob jobs.
    All other things being equal (income being the big one), someone who’s emotionally intelligent and mentally stable is probably less likely to go under the knife to meet some beauty ideal than a woman who’s depressed or has another mental illness.

  6. Posted August 8, 2007 at 2:30 pm | Permalink

    I’ve always noticed that most of my female friends and aquaintences felt that they were “ugly” and “flawed” no matter how attractive they actually were.
    I know women who talk about their bodies the way butchers talk about cuts of beef and openly speak of what parts of their bodies they would have “fixed” if they had enough money to pay for plastic surgery.
    By contrast, none of my male friends or aquaintences has ever spoke about getting plastic surgery – no matter how fat or unattractive they actually were.
    It’s actually pretty remarkable – most women I know think they are “ugly” and need surgery to look good, while I’ve never met any men who think like that.
    Maybe that’s why so many women who’ve had breast implants are suicidally depressed – even after $ 8,000 worth of painful unnecessary surgery, they still think they are “ugly”.
    Our society is sick!!!

  7. SarahMC
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 2:37 pm | Permalink

    I know women who talk about their bodies the way butchers talk about cuts of beef and openly speak of what parts of their bodies they would have “fixed” if they had enough money to pay for plastic surgery.
    By contrast, none of my male friends or aquaintences has ever spoke about getting plastic surgery

    But do your male friends talk about women’s bodies in a derogatory way?
    A lot of times “guy talk” re: women sounds a lot like the way a butcher might talk. “Ass man,” “breast man,” not to mention the horrible way fat (or even slightly overweight) women are treated.

  8. Posted August 8, 2007 at 2:38 pm | Permalink

    I’ve always considered any kind of non re-constructive cosmetic surgery to be pretty damn unhealthy. I personally think that indicates pretty extreme issues with one’s body, and that certainly doesn’t reflect well on the state of one’s emotional health.
    Please set me straight if I’m being judgmental. I don’t blame the women who undergo cosmetic surgery; I blame our sick society, the constant images and remarks that have told them that they’re not good enough, and surgeons willing to make money off of the situation. I’m just a big fan of loving your body how it is. And though I’ve certainly thought about what I would change about my body “if I could,” I can’t even imagine actually going to a doctor to obtain surgery to make those changes.

  9. Posted August 8, 2007 at 2:56 pm | Permalink

    SarahMC – yeah, most guys I know do talk about women’s bodies in a very judgemental way.
    There is a racial divide about HOW they judge women’s bodies – most of the White guys I know like extremely skinny women with small butts and very large breasts, while most White and Latino guys I know like curvy, voluptuous women with big breasts, big hips and big behinds.
    But, the main theme is, they DO judge women by their bodies.
    By contrast, most women I know judge men by our wallets – generally, they’re attracted to lawyers, doctors or businessmen, will “settle” for a carpenter, electrician, transit worker, cop or fireman and would be very disappointed if they were dating a supermarket clerk, vendor or restaurant dishwasher and wouldn’t dream of being involved with an unemployed man.
    Basically, men judge women on appearance, women judge men on income.

  10. JPlum
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 2:58 pm | Permalink

    Well, as someone who is fat, but has in the past been thin, and before that fat, and before that… you get the picture. Anyway, I’ve had issues with depression for a long time, but you know what makes me happy? Being thin. Yes, being thin drastically reduced my level of depression. You can about how women should or shouldn’t feel this or that, but how dare you say that it’s wrong for me to be happy when I’m thin, because I’m thin (I’m not saying that any of you are saying this, but there is always an undercurrent in feminist discussions of weight, that it is wrong to be happier when you are thin). Why should I love my body the way it is? No one else does, even with the lip service paid by some skinny feminists to the fabulousness and beauty of fat women.
    Okay, that was a bit ranty.
    Personally, I don’t get the wanting to have big breasts thing. I have them, and I can’t buy woven shirts, I can’t buy dresses, my bras cost over $150.

  11. Brig
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 3:09 pm | Permalink

    I found this paragraph interesting:
    “Scientists tracked the women for as long as 29 years after their implant surgeries and found the suicide risk increased over time. There was no higher risk in the first 10 years afterward, they said, but the risk was 4.5 times higher after 10 to 19 years and six times higher after 20 years.”
    To me this indicates greater mental disease (as in discomfort) with aging. I always feel bad for women who place so much of their self-worth on their appearance. These things are fleeting, even as they are augmentable.

  12. Posted August 8, 2007 at 3:10 pm | Permalink

    kissmypineapple: sorry about the term; it seemed the best way to indicate the dilemma from the perspective of the person involved.

  13. the frog queen
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 3:12 pm | Permalink

    I’m not always comfortable in my body, but I would NEVER consider surgery.
    JPlum, I don’t recall the site ever critisizing anyone for feeling good when their “thin” or “thinner”. I always get the impression that the site supports the equality in peoples size… which being a bit chunky, you may have noticed being treated differently… I certainly have.

  14. SarahMC
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 3:20 pm | Permalink

    So, Gregory, is it any surprise that women are practically killing themselves to be “perfect”?
    And that “women judge guys by their income” bull is so old. Maybe you’re hanging around the wrong women? Because that’s about the least important thing about someone, IMO. I make more than my boyfriend, a number of my friends do, and I can’t imagine being with a guy for his money. That’s what’s so liberating about feminism: goodbye, old rules about relationships.

  15. Posted August 8, 2007 at 3:24 pm | Permalink

    SarahMC – it’s not “bull” to say that MOST women judge men by their income.
    Perhaps feminist women don’t (and that’s a GOOD thing) – but most women I know are NOT feminist, unfortunately.
    And, you have to admit, most nonfeminist women judge men on our economic resources.
    You and your friends don’t – and that’s wonderful…I really wish there were more women like you and your friends – but you’ve got to admit, most women are, sadly, not like you and your friends are.

  16. William
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 3:24 pm | Permalink

    I really hate it when studies like these come out. I’ve seen this study reported with a variety of misleading headlines, all of which seem to miss that correlation does not imply causation. Its sloppy reporting of sloppy science.
    Worse, the study seems to look at women from 1965 to 1993 and claims that 15% of them had body dysmorphic disorder, something the researchers couldn’t possibly know unless they managed to track down every single patient. BDD wasn’t recognized by any body until 1987, and diagnostic criteria from the DSM weren’t available until 1997.
    The big problem with this sloppy research is that it gets people talking, but it doesn’t actually address the real issue of women getting surgery in the name of beauty. It doesn’t give us any real information, doesn’t contribute to the body of knowledge, doesn’t even provide a useful springboard for discussion because its so badly put together that any talk is just speculation.

  17. Kimmy
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 3:29 pm | Permalink

    Gregory, please don’t make blanket statements about women based on a few shallow people you know (if that’s even what they really do).
    Many women actually base their opinions on the guy in question. My boyfriend, for instance, made less than $10,000 last year (he survived on his savings) and is now in the process of looking for a better job. However, it won’t be a six figure job, or even a high five figure job. Just a decent job that pays a living wage.
    I love him anyway. Know why? Because he’s a person and I judge him as such. Many women do. To say that all women judge men by their wallets is to assume that no man is ever loved. Which is just as depressing as assuming no woman is.

  18. SarahMC
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 3:36 pm | Permalink

    I agree, Kimmy. And Gregory, I agree that most women aren’t feminist and that’s unfortunate.
    But in general, I don’t think women are with men because they like the looks of their bank accounts. Some, sure. But geez.

  19. the frog queen
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 3:40 pm | Permalink

    I don’t know any women who look at men like they’re walking wallets… I can’t even think of one, and I know a lot of people.
    But I know a hell of a lot of guys who wouldn’t consider dating a gal that wasn’t skinny. A lot of my boyfriends friend’s are like that. My boyfriend however, is not.

  20. SarahMC
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 3:44 pm | Permalink

    I echo the frog queen. It’s taking the convo off-topic, but other than the women on reality tv, I don’t know anyone who only dates rich men or men in certain professions. It’s so foreign to me.
    But it’s hard to escape the fact that many men talk about women like they’re pieces of meat. And that certainly contributes to women feeling like they have to get bigger boobs, smaller thighs, tinier noses, etc.

  21. Posted August 8, 2007 at 4:13 pm | Permalink

    “I don’t know any women who look at men like they’re walking wallets” – you have got to be kidding!!
    Frog Queen – I need to move to wherever it is that you and SarahMC live.
    Because, in my experience, that’s EXACTLY how most women view men – as a life support system for a wallet.
    Maybe in the social circiles that you and SarahMC move in, women are all egalitarian and aren’t interested in a man for primarily financial reasons.
    But, where I live (the neighborhood of West Harlem, Borough of Manhattan, City of New York) and where I work (installing office furniture in the hirise office building of Midtown Manhattan) women like you and SarahMC are few and far between.
    I would LOVE to meet women who would judge me based on my character, personality and committment to social change, rather than on how much I make per hour and the fact that I have a blue collar job.
    You see, Frog Queen, you, SarahMC and your friends live in an anomalous world – it appears that most women do NOT think about men like you do.

  22. Kimmy
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 4:21 pm | Permalink

    Hmmmmm. Who am I going to believe about how women think? The women, like Frog Queen, SarahMC, myself, and the gigantic number of women we all three know and have known in our lives? Or the individual man, who sounds sort of bitter?
    Decisions, decisions.

  23. SarahMC
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 4:26 pm | Permalink

    Gregory, you’ve got to start hanging out with feminist women. Seriously.

  24. Posted August 8, 2007 at 4:28 pm | Permalink

    Yeah. I mean, I pretty much would expect any man I was in a relationship with to have some type of employment, or at least a good reason (disability, layoff, etc.) for not having work. And there are certain professions that would bother me because of ethics (plastic surgeon, butcher, republican politician), but other than that, I’m pretty open. In fact, I financially supported my husband for over 8 months when he first immigrated to the country and could not work legally. I can’t think of any women I know who have ever griped about a man’s employment/financial status unless he was either jobless without good reason or particularly careless with his money.
    I mean, I’m sure that this does exist among some women, but I’ve sure never seen it. But I see men objectifying women’s bodies in one way or another pretty much every day of my life.

  25. SarahMC
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 4:33 pm | Permalink

    Cara, I didn’t know you were married!
    And I agree with your point. It’s not that I’m OK with men who work for the mob or Republican senators; I just don’t particularly care how much money my man makes.
    M and I alternate when it comes to entertainment, dinners out, movie tickets, etc. I’ll buy dinner if he’ll pay for the museum or whatever. Even if he made a lot of money (which he doesn’t), I wouldn’t expect him to drop loads of cash on me while I sit back and soak it all in. That’s so… retro. But I guess some women are like that. And men put up with it ’cause the want a piece. :shrug:

  26. Posted August 8, 2007 at 4:35 pm | Permalink

    “Gregory, you’ve got to start hanging out with feminist women. Seriously”
    SarahMC, I agree with you 1,000%!!!!
    If you know where I could find some feminist women in real life, let me know!

  27. oenophile
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 6:06 pm | Permalink

    Gregory,
    Find lawyers, doctors, and the like. Most of us can’t get dates because we are too successful and “intimidating.” Heck, my stepmom married the first guy who wasn’t upset that she made more than he did – and that was nearly 100 men later.
    I’m all for reconstructive surgery. I wonder what percentage of women who had this procedure done in the olden days were getting reconstruction. Just a guess, but having breast cancer or a really severe illness will make you more prone to suicide.
    This is sloppy “science.” The control group is not the population as a whole, but similarly-situated women who did not get plastic surgery. That would mean comparing women with breast cancer who got reconstruction with those who chose to not undergo it. That would mean comparing women with a psychological disorder who chose surgery with those who chose therapy.
    As for people being depressed over time – well, implants tend to cause a lot of physical problems over time. Many women experienced autoimmune disorders or needed to have the surgery all over again. That would make anyone depressed.

  28. Mina
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 6:28 pm | Permalink

    “Do they actually mean to suggest that the women in the study were suicidal because, in previous decades, society was not accepting of their silicone-enhanced breasts? I’d argue that today there is even more social pressure to look perfect than there was 40 years ago.”
    OTOH, there’s also the pressure to have been born with socially acceptable genes in the first place.
    Hence those people who dislike cosmetic surgery, have nothing good to say about women with small breasts or large noses, and sure seem to have a “how dare you trick people into thinking you’re normal” instead of a “you are normal” attitude towards women getting these treatments.
    It reminds me of the way the kids who harassed me when my beard and moustache first appeared kept harassing me for having that trait even after I switched from following Mom’s blonde hair dye advice to using a razor.
    “It’s actually pretty remarkable – most women I know think they are ‘ugly’ and need surgery to look good, while I’ve never met any men who think like that.”
    I have.
    “Please set me straight if I’m being judgmental. I don’t blame the women who undergo cosmetic surgery; I blame our sick society, the constant images and remarks that have told them that they’re not good enough, and surgeons willing to make money off of the situation.”
    I once knew a surgeon who did breast reduction (removal, really) surgeries for men with gynecomastia. I agree with you that societies rejecting women who don’t even have A-cups, men who do have B-cups, etc. is sick. I can’t agree that surgeons’ willingness to help these people improve our chances of passing job interviews (instead of having the interviewers think “yuck, you freaky pervert”) is also bad.

  29. Maggie
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 7:13 pm | Permalink

    “Personally, I don’t get the wanting to have big breasts thing. I have them, and I can’t buy woven shirts, I can’t buy dresses, my bras cost over $150.”
    My sister has the same problem and would LOVE to have a reduction, not only for how much easier clothes shopping would be, but also because she’s really tired of getting ogled. Unfortunately, whenever she mentions having surgery, she’s met with all kinds of protests on the “you should love your body the way it is” wavelength, often by women who take diet pills/excercise obsessively/have removed carbs from their diets, etc. People who really don’t practice what they preach.
    I’m not dead-set against cosmetic surgery. If there’s something about your body that’s making you unhappy, you shouldn’t feel bad for wanting to change it. You have to live in your body, after all. But it’s a problem if you obsess over it, and when you see it as a magic solution to all your woes.

  30. SarahMC
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 8:08 pm | Permalink

    Well, not just doctors and lawyers, Oenophile. Doctors and lawyers are not the only intellegent women out there. Many intelligent, feminist women are employed in less thankful jobs.
    Let’s see… it’s hard to say “all [career] are feminists.” Because it just doesn’t work that way.
    But IMO, a lot of feminists work do social justice work or work for non-profits. For instance, my friend S. is an HIV-AIDS educator. She also volunteers with HIPS. Feminist women often choose to work for “feminist” causes (or “humanist” causes). She’s also working towards her masters in public health.
    I’d imagine that Amnesty International is full of feminist women. Stuff like that.
    I work for an association. :shrug:
    I suppose we can be found in independent book stores, at peace rallies, and volunteering for Planned Parenthood. Haha

  31. Posted August 8, 2007 at 8:17 pm | Permalink

    I think that the women who do get breast augmentation are insecure, and need it to make themselves feel better. When really, they look good just the way that they are. The research was forty years too late beucase as you noted; the standards for women to embellish themselves physically are much more severe then 40 years ago. The solution is to fight them with different styles of looking, and rebellious mannerisms.

  32. dirtybug
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 11:05 pm | Permalink

    Yeah, this study has been framed too many different ways for me to feel that it is legitimate. I have small breasts and I always will. I cant work them out, wear makeup on them or diet to make them do anything. I never cared, but after a string of things my friends (female) and boyfriend at the time said, it started really getting to me. It kills me that something I never felt was inadequate about myself is such fair game for almost everyone. It’s the answer to EVERYTHING. Women routinely argue, when being critiscized about their weight or discussing celebrities, that they’d rather have “curves” (read: breasts) than be stick thin. To me, it’s just a perpetual cycle of self destruction to defend the way you look by putting down someone else. No wonder women are depressed and driven to surgery, you can’t win no matter how you look and god forbid you dont have big breasts because then you’re just a complete outcast.

  33. John in Nashville
    Posted August 8, 2007 at 11:43 pm | Permalink

    This is off the main topic of the post, but please indulge a comment about Ann’s verbiage. Gratitous references to “sound[ing] like a forced-pregnancy advocate” and to “the anti-choice movement” added nothing of value to the post.
    Why do those of us on the abortion rights side of the debate embrace such stilted language? The procedure is an abortion, not (shudder) the surgery that dare not speak its name.
    I understand and appreciate the distinction between favoring abortion rights and favoring abortions. “Anti-choice,” however, has not become less grating with popular overuse. “Forced pregnancy” should be reserved for pregnancy resulting from forcible rape. The denial of abortion services does not cause, let alone force, pregnancy–the need for abortion in a particular case presupposes an already existing pregnancy.
    Let’s be honest in our use of language, and leave the obfuscation to the doctor killers.

  34. kissmypineapple
    Posted August 9, 2007 at 12:21 am | Permalink

    John in Nashville: The pregnancy, of course, exists before the abortion is sought, but when people push their personal beliefs between me and my abortion, they force me to continue to be pregnant. That’s a forced pregnancy.
    I also am glad someone above pointed out that when our media says women have curves, or curvy women are now in, what they mean are big breasted and tiny waisted women. They don’t mean women with thick arms, tummies, or big thighs. It’s always be curvy on top, but skinny all over. I always liked my breasts, until I started dating. And now I’m in a constant cycle of wearing a psychotically padded bra, and feeling guilty for not loving my body the way it is, and then feeling guilty for letting a few men make me feel shitty about my breasts, and then even worse, because if I had huge boobs to begin with, I wouldn’t have a problem. My boyfriend recently said he would like it if I didn’t feel the need to wear padded bras anymore, because he likes the natural shape of my breasts…I seriously teared up, because that was the nicest thing a man had ever said about my body in my entire life. How sick is that??
    Even though I’m obsessed with boobs and how mine stack up against other women’s (again, sick, sick, sick, how do I get this out of my head?), I could never have my chest cut open to make other people happy. Because, for me, I would then feel terrible for the rest of my life that I spent all that money to reach a cultural ideal, when I should have just told whoever that he didn’t exactly look like my ideal either. But I’ll never show any disrespect for a woman who does have surgery. I’m not angry with her; I’m angry that our culture convinces women that they need to be sliced up to be beautiful and wanted.

  35. cherylp
    Posted August 9, 2007 at 12:45 am | Permalink

    I agree with everyone picking out the holes in this study and the way it’s being covered. I do want to add that it still kind of struck me in an emotional way, because I have BDD and have been in and out of treatment for it for years. And yeah, that’s a difficult thing to deal with, knowing that you can’t trust your own eyes and feelings. But I can seriously imagine thinking that you could do this one thing, ‘fix’ this one thing about your body, and you’d be happy. Then to feel exactly the same, or perhaps worse afterward? Absolutely devastating. I am unsurprised about this outcome if the women did indeed have BDD beforehand. Scary shit.

  36. UCLAbodyimage
    Posted August 9, 2007 at 1:24 am | Permalink

    A couple random points from the Body Image world:
    1) Most reviews conclude that on average, cosmetic surgery patients don’t differ much from controls on psychological well-being, and studies that do find differences typically find small differences. Cosmetic surgery patients, on average, differ primarily from controls because they have greater dissatisfaction with specific body parts, but not necessarily with overall appearance.
    2) Women overestimate the breast size preferred by the average man, and the majority of men report satisfaction with both the size and shape of their partners breasts. Unfortunately, 70% of women report some of dissatisfaction (size or shape) with their breasts.
    3) Our partners rate us as more attractive than our we rate ourselves.
    4) Studies conflict regarding men’s preferences for breast size – some find that men prefer large breasts, others that men prefer medium size breasts, and others that they prefer small breasts. In other words, there is a lot of variability in men’s preferences.
    So don’t let the comments of the most vocal jackassess get you down!
    I can of course provide cites if anyone is interested.

  37. Rock Star
    Posted August 9, 2007 at 12:33 pm | Permalink

    kissmypineapple- I’m totally happy for you that you have a boyfriend who can appreciate your body the way it is, b/c I hear about too many men with some ridiculous aesthetic. I have huge boobs, and for some reason, some men think it’s appropriate to tell me I need a breast reduction, and others think it’s appropriate to tell me that “guys who say that are fags”…because it’s somehow my job to walk around in discomfort for your pleasure? That’s not even addressing the homophobic slur.
    One of my friends recently had a breast reduction, and (i hope to be able to afford one someday) and she said she didn’t understand why anyone would get breast implants, but she doesn’t know and may feel differently if she had had small boobs. However, I’m not sure why anyone would want to look out of proportion, be unable to find a swimsuit ANYWHERE, have a hard time finding blouses, jackets, and dresses, be uncomfortable most of the time, especially when working out, and want to put a foreign object into your breasts to achieve all this…

  38. SarahMC
    Posted August 9, 2007 at 1:28 pm | Permalink

    Ooooh, I hate the “curves are IN!” crap, too. Say what you mean: large breasts, small waists and average hips are in.
    Who’s supposed to be “curvy?” ScarJo. Kate Winslet.
    Come on. They have classic hourglass figures. They’re nowhere near fat.
    If your “curves” fall more around your gut than in your hips or breasts, you don’t count. You’re not “in;” you’re just fat.

  39. Mina
    Posted August 9, 2007 at 8:14 pm | Permalink

    “The solution is to fight them with different styles of looking, and rebellious mannerisms.”
    Would those mannerisms include farming, fishing, hunting, and/or gathering?
    After all, the less you need to interact with other people to get food on the table, the less you need them approving of you enough to interact with you. No wonder the rest of us worry more about what other people think of us…
    “2) Women overestimate the breast size preferred by the average man,”
    Um, what about context? When people judge you for your looks, chances are they’re seeing your breasts attached to the rest of you instead of in a vaccuum.
    For example, I bet that my AA-cups would be more acceptable if I didn’t also have all this body hair growing back, and that the 5 o’clock shadow on my arms would be less noticeable if I didn’t also have nearly no breasts.
    “However, I’m not sure why anyone would want to look out of proportion, be unable to find a swimsuit ANYWHERE, have a hard time finding blouses, jackets, and dresses, be uncomfortable most of the time, especially when working out, and want to put a foreign object into your breasts to achieve all this…”
    That’s not what I’d like implants for. I’d just like to have breasts that will still be there after I exercise instead of completely destroyed. Right now I’m afraid of exercising because whenever I burn fat it comes off my chest and whenever I gain fat it doesn’t go back there. Any more workouts and I’ll have a flatter chest than my brother has.
    Meanwhile, I do have 100% female ovaries and a uterus, but I can’t let my bosses and coworkers see *those* to lower the odds of the “is she really a he?” rumors coming back. As for my heavy flow days, letting those show would prove I’m female but most likely get me fired and billed for the stained chair too.

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