Imus apologizes…

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Do you care?

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87 Comments

  1. Ninapendamaishi
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 11:36 am | Permalink

    Richard,
    I will talk about other cases etc. later when I am not studying for a huge midterm taking place this afternoon b/c I do think that’s important. But I don’t even need to talk about other cases, I can give you a list of things that have happened to myself, family and friends that exhibit sexism and racism and physical, material, and/or emotional damage. We could also talk about general populations. Like for instance, why do white men currently have disproportionately high incomes, representation in government and legal system, and ownership in businesses? You could make the “inherent differences” argument. You could make the “historical reasons and we don’t have any obligation to make things equal now” argument. Either way, do you honestly thing the socioeconomically different conditions of these various groups of people do not affect their experience and the way they are treated in day-to-day life?
    Again, you wanna talk facts and specific examples, just not now. Now=MIDTERM

  2. Ninapendamaishi
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 11:40 am | Permalink

    Also, as I pointed out in the other thread, I don’t think you saying that the Duke case just got a lot of publicity because of the race of the people involved is terribly sophisticated of you.
    There are thousands of rapes of black women by white men every year, that do not receive nearly as much publicity, or any publicity at all. Rather, I think the fact it was an accusation of gang-rape by a big-name sports team in particular played a role in making it a sensational case…

  3. EG
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 11:43 am | Permalink

    Getting screamed at is one thing. Being thwarted in one’s life path is another.
    Being emotionally damaged is yet another.

    Ah, the sticks-and-stones argument. Racist harrassment is like sexual street harrassment–it’s easy to dismiss as unimportant when you’re not the one dealing with it, when you’re not the one who has to expend any amount of emotional energy being aware of it and deflecting it, when you’re not the one being reminded of your low status in the eyes of the majority, when you’re not the one who has to spend time judging whether the harrasser is a physical threat or just a loudmouth, when you’re not the one who has to put on an extra layer of readiness every time you leave your house. How lucky for you. You can take all that energy, all that thought and consciousness, and focus on other stuff. And that’s what racist and sexist street harrassment takes away from the rest of us.
    As to rape cases, that’s not really what this thread is about. But why don’t you take a stroll through the last, oh, six months of archives before you start talking about how some rape cases are more equal than others. The sad fact is that rape is a common crime. No blog is going to be able to cover all the cases. Hence most of the attention will be paid to rape cases that are unusual in some way–because they involve extremely young or extremely old people, because they’re particularly violent, because they involve some particularly egregious miscarriage of justice, because they’re getting a lot of press in the mainstream media. That said, Feministing does a fine job of covering sexual violence against women. Which you’d know if you did a little research in the archives.
    Another fine example of the “if I don’t experience it/know about it, it doesn’t exist/matter” mentality.

  4. Richard Aubrey
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 12:07 pm | Permalink

    EG.
    Then I’d expect feminists to be interested in getting the folks with the big mouths–the Gang of 88 at Duke, the president, and so forth–as motivated by the current rape as they were by a non-rape. Doesn’t the difference mean anything at all? Did the potbangers run out of pots?
    The socioeconomic differences are a matter of what somebody whom I cannot recall described as “Historical Inertia” or “momentum”.
    Thomas Sowell said cultures vary and differences have consequences.
    Ethnic Chinese in Southeast Asia are disproportionately wealthy. We had a Malaysian exchange student of ethnic Chinese descent in our area some time back. She couldn’t get into a Malaysian university because they had a quota system. If they let people in on merit, there’d be too many Chinese and too few Malaysians. So she came here and got her BS Chem Eng at Ann Arbor and MS Chem Eng at U-Wis and married an American. We win, Malaysia loses.
    Others have pointed out that the ethnic groups in India who are known for commercial entrepreneurial spirit are doing well as ex-pats at the job in Africa. The warrior tribes continue to be recruited by the Indian army, leaving the shopkeeping tribes to run their shops.
    The Nigerian Civil War–The Biafran War–pitted two separate cultures against each other. The losers were the ones more economically sucessful, which annoyed the more numerous Hausa. In Mau Mau, the Kyukyu rebelled and the Masai didn’t. Different cultures, different ways of life, different concerns. Robert Ruark did a florid fictional book called “Something of Value” about it.
    For a view on the subject, see Bill Cosby. Or Mawhinney on the cracker culture of the South.
    It might be a surprise, but the majority of white people have no interest whatsoever in spending any time at all figuring out ways to screw The Other. The Other isn’t that important.

  5. Kimmy
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 12:24 pm | Permalink

    Richard, you are not to presume to speak for the majority of white people. Or any white people besides yourself. You don’t know what you’re talking about.
    The Other isn’t important? The Other is always important. People of color may be The Other to some white folks, but that doesn’t make them unimportant. Women may be The Other to some men, but that doesn’t make them unimportant. Same with gays and straights, and all the variations in between.
    You may not care about those who aren’t like you, but kindly don’t presume to speak for the rest of us. And for the record, in a lot of cases white men (particularly) don’t have to figure out how to screw The Other. It’s like they already have a prepared package on doing it.
    Of course, you’ll probably just pick some sound bite of your own to repeat and ignore the actual content of my posts, as you’ve done with me before.

  6. Ninapendamaishi
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 12:30 pm | Permalink

    Richard,
    Again, I’ll get to specific facts and examples later because that will make more time. I think what the “majority” of white people want would be hard to determine. I also don’t think it’s terribly relevant. I don’t think we have to argue in terms of “majority” to debate this idea of yours that racism and sexism doesn’t exist and that “99%” of the times it is used it is bogus

  7. Richard Aubrey
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 12:33 pm | Permalink

    Well, let me put it this way.
    In all my adult life, the time I’ve spent listening to white people figuring out ways to screw The Other is zero. Ditto for reading.
    To be more precise, The Other is not particularly important to anybody I ever met.
    BTW, don’t anybody here presume to speak for anybody else, any group, any community. Right? Or is it just me?
    The interracial rape count is vastly in the direction of white vic, black perp. If you were concerned more about women than race, you’d be all over all rapes. But first comes the question of the racial lineup. Then, if that’s right, there’s outrage, or not.
    See the Wichita Horror.
    But, anyway, whatever you claim about your concern, you ought to be about getting the rest of society concerned. Like the Duke administration. For starters. But they’re allowed to pick and choose based on the racial lineup.
    The tragedy is that a disproportionate number of victims are minorities and the outrage is only for the rare cases where the perp is white-or in the lax, case, where the non-perp is white.

  8. the_becca
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 12:51 pm | Permalink

    Hey Richard! I’m a white person, and I disagree with you! haHA!
    Okay, on a more serious note:
    “In all my adult life, the time I’ve spent listening to white people figuring out ways to screw The Other is zero. Ditto for reading.”
    First of all, maybe it’s just me [somehow I doubt that], but your writing is making VERY little coherent sense. “Ditto for reading”? Who, reading what? Huh?
    Also, Newsflash: “The Other” is a theoretical model to explain certain social phenomena. The earth revolves around the sun and (as far as we know) doesn’t “think” (or “read”??) about it. Similarly, people behave in prejudiced ways and fuck each other over without (necessarily) having an oppression-planning meeting.

  9. Ninapendamaishi
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 12:51 pm | Permalink

    “In all my adult life, the time I’ve spent listening to white people figuring out ways to screw The Other is zero.”
    Why would they tell you?
    You also stated previously that you don’t think you know any women who have been raped, which is statistically highly unlikely. I don’t think anyone else on this website would say the same; I know more than a handful of loved ones and friends. I think what it means is that you are not a good listener, or for whatever reason people don’t feel comfortable disclosing these things to you.
    I volunteer as a victim’s advocate, which makes me think I care a heck of a lot more about victims of sexual assaults than you do (you who started out the other thread by claiming the overall rape statistics are overblown, and you don’t know anyone who has been raped).
    I’ll attend to the rest this later…

  10. Ninapendamaishi
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 12:58 pm | Permalink

    I mean yeah, Richard, you’re right. That other rape at Duke is awful. I’ve got my hands full though with schooling and volunteering and whatnot. Why don’t you go to the administration at Duke and see if you can’t crank up their resources to prevent sexual assaults and take care of victims. In my opinion, most colleges in this country do not have as many resources as they should in educating people to begin with and then in taking care of victims, and colleges are generally doing better than the country at large. Say Richard, that’s a great idea! Why don’t you become an activist for the rights of all rape victims! (cuz I’m fairly sure some of us can already describe ourselves that way)

  11. Genny
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 1:12 pm | Permalink

    Richard, I don’t see what the point is in telling us that there’s a different rape case at Duke that’s not receiving attention, because I could comb through local newspapers and find similar ones in any city in this country. The Duke lacrosse case got attention on this site because of the media storm that surrounded it, if you want to ask someone why they focused on that case and not the other one, ask CNN or the district atttorney. We don’t make the news, they do.
    Furthermore, as a white girl who grew up in a black neighborhood I can tell you that racism does still exist, sometimes within the minority groups. I know I was called racial slurs, but so were the black kids who were in the talented and gifted class with me. The schools were run so incompetantly that it was nearly criminal and most children there had no access to up to date textbooks or a computer lab to use the internet. And when I moved to a majority white area, I heard people talking about being uncomfortable because (middle class) black families were moving to the county. One of my current roommates has stated “I don’t think I could ever date a black man”, she’s white. So no, I’ve never been to a secret “Whites Only” meeting where we talk about how to keep all these damned minorities down, but I’ve seen it happen in the real world due to the ignorance of people like you who assume everyone’s got a fair shot and if they aren’t successful with what they’re given then they’re just lazy and stupid. The kids I went to elementary school near DC with did not have the same chance that kids going to elementary school in majority white western maryland did. I saw both, and the differences where enormous. So yes, there is racism and it is inherent in the system and we don’t have to work at being racist because of that. We have to work at changing things to make them not racist.

  12. running_gal
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 1:18 pm | Permalink

    I could care less. Dick Imus is an ignorant and careless person. Not only is this a racist comment but it is also degrading to all women. So listen up ladies he offened all of us. For all of the networks that cancelled this racist and sexist pig…WHOOOO!!! We can all learn from this, by shutting people like Imus down we have made one large step for mankind!!

  13. EG
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 1:31 pm | Permalink

    In all my adult life, the time I’ve spent listening to white people figuring out ways to screw The Other is zero. Ditto for reading.
    To be more precise, The Other is not particularly important to anybody I ever met.

    You don’t have to have secret meetings. You’ve got an entire socio-economic system that does it for you. You’ve got national cultural figures who think it’s OK to call people “nappy-headed hos.” You don’t have to think about it; privilege is the ability to remain ignorant about racism because it doesn’t affect you. Perhaps if you actually listened to and took seriously the experiences of nonwhite people in this country, you’d grasp that.
    Further, I can’t think of yet another way to phrase this, but: it’s not about you. It’s not about your experiences. White people tend not to have to experience racism. Men tend not to have to experience sexism. In other words, if you actually pay attention to what people who are not like you are saying, you just might learn something.

  14. Vervain
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 1:44 pm | Permalink

    Shorter Richard:
    “What is this “racism” and “sexism” you speak of? Since I have experienced no such oppression, it clearly does not exist.”
    Much shorter Richard:
    “Let them eat cake!”
    And Rosa Parks should have demonstrated her “strength” by smiling obligingly and saying, “Sure, I’d be glad to move. Here, have my seat!”
    It would appear Richard is utterly egocentric–as per the psychological definition often associated with Jean Piaget, not the social definition meaning simply “selfish.” Like a child in the early stages of cognitive development, Richard cannot comprehend the fact that his experience and perception of the world around him are different from the experiences and perceptions of others. However, since Richard is obviously not a child, I must conclude his egocentrism is entirely willful and deliberate. It is apparent that he has no interest in even entertaining the notion of a universe in which he is not the center.
    He demonstrates this amply in his comments, wherein he implies that racism is just a ploy used by manipulative whiners, “professional victims” and “race-hustlers” to gain sympathy–except, of course, when it’s directed at white men like him, in which case it’s a vile, disgusting outrage and the very worst kind of injustice!! In Richard’s world, the only “real” racism and sexism is that which is perpetrated against–wait for it–white men like him. Like a child who thinks if he covers his own eyes, no one else can see him, Richard thinks his reality defines all reality. If something outrages him, then we should all be as outraged. If something doesn’t bother him, none of us should be bothered, either.
    Did your alien leaders forget to send you the empathy upgrade, Richard? However do you manage? Do you spend so much time commenting on blogs because real people just don’t seem to like you? Maybe if you bothered to pull your head out of your own ass once in a while, you’d notice there are other people in the world besides you.
    I am in agreement with Charity. If reading Feministing comes to mean sifting through cluttered threads wherein Richard waxes pedantic about The World According to Richard to the occlusion of all other discussion, then there will be no reason for me to bother reading Feministing at all. Ben Franklin is dead, and I have no interest in hearing what this “Poor Richard” has to say.

  15. EG
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 1:47 pm | Permalink

    Vervain, you are on such a roll lately. Lovely.

  16. Kimmy
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 1:50 pm | Permalink

    Vervain, I can only say:
    *hee*hee*hee*hee*hee*

  17. Charity
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 1:53 pm | Permalink

    Vervain, that was hilarious, and I really needed that today.

  18. Richard Aubrey
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 1:54 pm | Permalink

    Vervain (& others).
    The reason I talk about my experiences has to do with probability theory. To put it without the math:
    The likely thing to happen is the likely thing that will happen. So if something happens, it’s likely that it’s the likely thing. Things are likely in proportion to their numerical proportion.
    So, what has happened to me in my adult life, which is likely more than some of you in your lives, possibly by a factor of 1.5 or 2, is the most likely thing to happen.
    It’s unlikely that the unlikely thing will happen.
    Always keeping in mind that, while it is unlikely, the opposite could be true once in a while, (but that’s not the way to bet).
    Still, the existence of racism is not my point. My point is that the accusation of racism, and sexism are almost certainly bogus.
    I don’t have or participate in a blog or group patting myself on the back as a rape opposer. Those who do ought to understand that if they have double standards, people won’t take them seriously.
    Yeah, I understand the Duke lax case was the media’s perfect storm. That doesn’t explain the huge number of people slamming the non-perps against increasing evidence that they didn’t do it.

  19. Ninapendamaishi
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 2:04 pm | Permalink

    You wanna assume you’ve been perfectly in tune with the world and people have expressed to you their most innermost secrets, then fine. Let’s do probability.
    You have me, EG, Vervain, and at least a couple of other people who have experienced and seen overt racism and/or sexism in our lives, such that it affected people’s physical, material, and emotional well-being. Now, you take our average age (I don’t quite know really, but I’d guess 25 at least) and multiply that times all these women telling you about their experiences (specifically that in their experience, the the application of the terms racism and sexism is not bogus 99% of the time), and the probability we’re right is larger than the probability you’re right. So there!

  20. Richard Aubrey
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 2:20 pm | Permalink

    Nina. You’re not going to like this.
    But I don’t trust activists’ numbers.
    The Duke study which elevated groping to rape is just one reason.
    The NEED for such things to happen influence perception.
    When I was a kid, women used to wear strange things on their heads loosely called “hats”, on formal occasions. It was a standing joke how insecure many of them were about what the stupid things looked like. So, says the gestalt psych prof, using this as an example, when a woman wearing this confection on her head is walking down the street and hears laughter, she is inclined to think it’s about her hat. The process is measured in the Thematic Apperception Test.
    So, even if you do not deliberately make up numbers, I do not trust your percepton of ambiguous situations.
    For the record: My wife was assaulted in an earlier century on a subway in Spain. Being 5’8″, she was bigger than most Spaniards and shoved the guy away. My daughter was assaulted, but, unhappily for your point, it was by another girl.
    My daughter and daughter in law both faced serious obstacles in their career paths, at the hands of dishonest and incompetent educrats who were…women.
    Now, let me discriminate here. The occurrence of unpleasant happenings is one thing. The insistence that each of them is wounding in the extreme is another and I don’t believe the latter. If it is true for an individual, I would suggest that person seek help.

  21. Ninapendamaishi
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 2:33 pm | Permalink

    “My daughter was assaulted, but, unhappily for your point, it was by another girl.”
    How is that unhappy for my point? When did I ever say women don’t sometimes assault other women? My father was sexually abused as a young boy by a man he didn’t know. That doesn’t change the fact that sexual assault is overwhelmingly a male against female crime, and that our society which in many instances OKs the idea women’s sexuality is not their own and low-level violence (harassment, groping) of women is okay. Incidentally, in surveys the men most likely to report that they have forced a sex act on someone are /conservate males who believe in traditional gender roles/. My grandmother was frequently beaten by her husband, and I’m fairly sure she had no sexual rights in her marriage, either. My best friend (quite small in stature) was sexually assaulted twice by her college boyfriend. Another friend was born physically disabled and assaulted by a stranger as a girl. Another friend was raped by her high school boyfriend. I have experienced plenty of harassment both verbal and physical since the age of 12 or 13, in addition to a boyfriend who was constantly trying to push my sexual boundaries (and I pushed back, and broke up with him, and think I’m generally ok).
    “The occurrence of unpleasant happenings is one thing. The insistence that each of them is wounding in the extreme is another and I don’t believe the latter. If it is true for an individual, I would suggest that person seek help.”
    Victims of rape often do seek help, but if you are for an instant suggesting that b/c this a common crime people need to stop complaining about it or work on getting over it (and bloody effing hell, do you not think people don’t /want/ to get over their trauma? whether it be from harassment or from physical violence, people don’t sit around moping just to annoy /old white men like yourself/. many people struggle for years trying to get over things -or simply to acknowledge to themself that it really happened) I want you off this effing forum.
    Dear bloGod, I do not usually pray but this is getting to be too much. Please deliver us before you lose feministing readers…

  22. Charity
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 2:37 pm | Permalink

    OK, the Thematic Apperception Test…that’s golden, I mean pure golden comedy now. And “gestalt psych.” That’s sheer gold. What’s next, another complete mischaracterization and misapplication of something you heard about once 30 years ago? How about “accusations of racism are like a Skinner box…” Or “claims of violence against women are the Jungian mandala of today.” “If you think there’s really an Other, have I got a Lewin’s field theory for you!!”
    Shorter Richard: What’s happened to me is what’s most likely to happen to ANYONE else. Because I’m…older. {Richard’s inner dialogue: Wait. That doesn’t even make sense to ME anymore. Hats. Say something about hats!!)
    Other shorter Richard: I’m not saying that racism isn’t real, but *accusations of racism* are not real! It may exist, but not in a way that can be *identified* or *talked about*! Wait, psychedelic again! I can totally like, taste what you’re saying Richard! I think time just folded in on itself!
    Shortest Richard: I’ve just proven Vervain’s point without a TRACE of irony or self-awareness! Brilliant.

  23. EG
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 2:40 pm | Permalink

    (Yet another) Shorter Richard: If blacks and women would just stop complaining about their insignificant problems, then there wouldn’t be any problems. At least for me.

  24. Vervain
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 3:11 pm | Permalink

    *chokes on Dr. Pepper*
    LOL, Charity. I was going to say something, but I figured it would just sound smug, coming from me. Thanks.

  25. Ninapendamaishi
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 3:15 pm | Permalink

    I do have to say Charity,
    maybe it’s my latent flower-child-wannabe tendencies, but I think I heart you.

  26. the_becca
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 3:39 pm | Permalink

    Without having read through all this stuff: Jeez, this is going on WAY too long. I hope you guys have boring office jobs where there’s nothing to do but mess around on the internet, because this [by which I mean Richard, who has probably given us around 50,000 of his words by now, very few of which make much sense] is not worth missing or being late to anything important (like I almost was earlier). Wow.

  27. Ninapendamaishi
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 3:55 pm | Permalink

    heh. I am currently in my least favorite class. It happens to consist completely of reading the original texts of the last 300 years worth of famous, very culturally conservative, well-off white male political philosophers.

  28. the_becca
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 3:57 pm | Permalink

    (After actually reading all this) — I was going to post something but I see that Charity has pretty much already done it for me.
    I did want to add something though:
    For the record: My wife was assaulted in an earlier century on a subway in Spain. Being 5’8″, she was bigger than most Spaniards and shoved the guy away. My daughter was assaulted, but, unhappily for your point, it was by another girl… The occurrence of unpleasant happenings is one thing. The insistence that each of them is wounding in the extreme is another and I don’t believe the latter.
    Okay, let me get this straight: Are you seriously saying that you don’t believe that the assaults of your own wife and daughter were “wounding”? Do they have email addresses? I’d like to send them a copy of this.

  29. Kimmy
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 3:57 pm | Permalink

    Right in one, in my case. Office job. Boring. And I have two more hours to kill before I can go home, so…

  30. the_becca
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 4:05 pm | Permalink

    Nina — Fun! I’ve spent the past few weeks in a class in which I argue with my professor about how soulless and evil I think Machiavelli is (which ultimately comes down to how retarded I think Thrasymachus’s argument in Plato’s Republic is). My professor, a Straussian, disagrees. Woohoo.

  31. Richard Aubrey
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 4:27 pm | Permalink

    Thank you for inquiring about my wife and daughter.
    Both are getting along quite well.
    The thing that bothers my daughter, still, considerably more, and took her longer to get over, was the mistreatment by a bunch of soulless educrats who damned near stopped her career as an alternative to doing the minimum in their jobs. In addition to putting an obstacle in her way, they added documentation referring to her inadequacy, which were bogus.
    While she was out of school, she got a job working the desk at a motel. The state police had a meeting there, one was rude and so she complained to the state police. The guy got fired. So, even when emotionally down, she had strength. I am proud of her, but what she has is not impossible for others. Which is why I think whining about being Imused is silly, bogus or not.
    No, I wasn’t talking about rape victims. I was talking about people complaining of having been Imused.
    We are unfree to the extent that others have unwanted power to influence us. Being more free is better than being less free, which means it is a positive thing to work toward not worrying what some clown says. If you can’t do that by yourself, you should seek help.
    I fully expect advocate/activist types to misrepresent what is said by someone they don’t like to another party who has no idea what was said. I don’t get how the math works out when people misrepresent what a person said to the person himself. I think we can presume the person who said whatever it was knows what he said. I don’t see the benefit. Is this supposed to mislead somebody about what they said?
    When I was in college, I worked at Rust College, in Holly Springs, MS in a combined civil rights/education program in the mid-Sixties. The second summer, my partner was a fabulously beaufitul young woman, not in the Audrey Hepburn mode beautiful, I should say.
    Though warm and friendly with friends, her public self-presentation was “don’t even think it”, which seemed to succeed. I asked her years later when the group was pondering a reunion if she’d been harassed by any of our male colleagues. Nope, she said. So there we were, in what amounted to a diving bell for isolation and the most likely prospect for harassment said nothing had happened. We had never had anything social going on, but were on a could-talk basis and we discussed more difficult subjects than that,so I am confident she told me the truth.
    From this I take the lesson that she’d been sufficiently harassed in her life to put on a kind of armor. But that was for public purposes. (Certain writers have said that a purposeful demeanor deters assault, compared to wimpy bearing.) She was not, as far as I could determine, wounded in any way.
    And if Imus, in any of his other nonsense, had made a stupid remark about, say, blondes, she wouldn’t have given it a second thought.

  32. Jessica
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 5:03 pm | Permalink

    jeez, how did the troll get through? sorry, folks.

  33. Posted April 16, 2007 at 5:08 pm | Permalink

    did you get rid of him, Jessica?

  34. Charity
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 5:11 pm | Permalink

    I’m apparently always snarky so why should this time be any different? :)
    Richard, man, you have totally blown my mind with the truth you are speaking. Re: your daughter:
    “While she was out of school, she got a job working the desk at a motel. The state police had a meeting there, one was rude and so she complained to the state police. The guy got fired. So, even when emotionally down, she had strength. I am proud of her, but what she has is not impossible for others.”
    Your daughter complaining about a jerk and getting them fired was an example of her “strength” even when “emotionally down.” People complaining about Imus and getting him fired, on the other hand, is not a demonstration of strength, but rather, of “silly” “whining.” *I totally get it. Dude, I’m so with you…and I’m like seeing the head of a WOLF and it’s like, wearing a raincoat I can smell YELLOW.*
    But no, seriously now, this is the most excellent thing I’ve ever read, anywhere, hands down:
    “I fully expect advocate/activist types to misrepresent what is said by someone they don’t like to another party who has no idea what was said. I don’t get how the math works out when people misrepresent what a person said to the person himself. I think we can presume the person who said whatever it was knows what he said. I don’t see the benefit. Is this supposed to mislead somebody about what they said?”
    *Totally, Richard. This is like, you read my fucking mind, man. We need to get this word out right away. I will let Grand Funk Railroad know, and have you ever rubbed yourself in this cool, brown moss? It’s amazing, man.*

  35. the_becca
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 5:20 pm | Permalink

    I totally get it. Dude, I’m so with you…and I’m like seeing the head of a WOLF and it’s like, wearing a raincoat I can smell YELLOW.
    Hahahahaha. That was a particularly gorgeous bit of Richard-ean logic: “My daughter is strong because she complained about a guy being rude and he got fired. Anyone can do that. Therefore, these women who complained about a guy being rude, leading to his firing, are whiners.” I actually said out loud “What the fuck?” when I read that.
    Must. Fight. Urge. To. Argue. With. Crazy.

  36. the_becca
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 5:25 pm | Permalink

    Also, what’s with this “math” motif? I think this might be one of those guys who gets high and starts rambling about how the golden ratio contains the secrets of the universe, or how “it’s like, NUMBERS, man! They’ve, like, GOT your NUMBERS.”

  37. donna darko
    Posted April 16, 2007 at 7:22 pm | Permalink

    My point is that the accusation of racism, and sexism are almost certainly bogus.
    My wife was assaulted in an earlier century
    The second summer, my partner was a fabulously beaufitul young woman, not in the Audrey Hepburn mode beautiful, I should say.
    ?????
    youzeguys, stop playing with the trolls!

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