A bundle of loot for a bundle of joy?

Calling all babymakers!
Due to the severe declining birth rates in Poland, the new government has recently introduced legislation that will compensate women — in dough — for each child that they bear. Lower-class women will receive even double the amount.
Women’s groups in Poland have said it will be unsuccessful and that the country should follow Sweden and France’s footsteps by providing better childcare facilities for working parents and increased paternity leave.
Thoughts?

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6 Comments

  1. Posted December 30, 2005 at 3:36 pm | Permalink

    Matka Boska Czestochowska! (That’s Polish for “Egad!”)
    This strikes me as hugely ironic given that a right-wing government has just taken power in recent parliamentary elections (they even did a brief about-face over plans to withdraw Polish troops in Iraq).
    I thought that the birthrate wouldn’t be so low considering Poland is the “land of the Poles and Polish teens, sensual girls, and sexy women”. But don’t take my word for it:
    http://www.polishmarriage.org/polishsex.html

  2. Posted December 30, 2005 at 6:30 pm | Permalink

    If women who choose (or are forced to by economic circumstances) to work outside the home are spoiled…what does that make men?

  3. Posted December 30, 2005 at 11:55 pm | Permalink

    Victim where? You first say that eastern europeans are “family-oriented” hotties that like to stay home with their children. And now they’re educated professionals (but still apparently hotter than Americans). Which is it?
    Or is it possible that the women’s movement has made it easier for women to make choices about what they do in life? You’re contradicting yourself in an attempt to discredit progress toward gender equity, and then copping out by calling American girls ugly sluts. You’ve guessed wrong about 80% of the characteristics of the people here you flame and fall back on misogynist talking points to disentangle yourself from your bald lies. It’s silly and you know better, or at least you should.

  4. Bloomberg
    Posted August 18, 2009 at 9:34 pm | Permalink

    Shops are turned into stage sets, installations and artworks, such as the Future Systems Selfridges store in Birmingham that looks like a reflective bubble, or Koolhaas’ Prada stores in Las Vegas and New York. The latter cost US$40 million for just 23,000 square feet of retail space. The ground floor has little merchandise.
    The majority is in the basement. It feels cramped and lacks appropriate lighting. Bars are becoming less like your local, which you could rely on being the same for years on end. Their design can change as fast as an art gallery. These trends are shaking the foundations of museums, libraries, art galleries, science centres, shopping malls, cultural centres as well as virtually every aspect of the business world. Design, multimedia, theatrics and soundscapes increasingly move centre-stage. Given that we are subject to the vagaries of fashion, ‘beyond the experience economy’ is already being discussed, in which a transformation economy where people will pay for a life-changing series of experiences is upon us.8 And then towards the ‘dream economy’?

  5. Life
    Posted December 23, 2009 at 6:21 am | Permalink

    This formula proved useful in judging whether or not any proposed change for any particular event would be equitable.
    In calculating the number of seats at the sites, blue-prints were used inasmuch as almost all sites were either in the process of alteration or enlargement. Some seats were reserved for emergency use.
    The calculation of the number of free seats was a matter of some difficulty, as estimates only were available of the number of the personnel under Article 48 of the Olympic Charter who would be present at each site after the Opening Ceremony, and as these seats occupied central positions, any change in the numbers of these seats would affect the arrangement of the entire stadium.
    The crescent type stand to be additionally installed in the upper part of the hackstand of the National Stadium, which was to be the main site of the Games, was originally planned as a standing room. However, in view of the administration of the site, this was changed to provide seating accommodation.
    Allocated number of tickets for regular events As in the case of the Opening and Closing Ceremonies, emphasis was laid on the general public and special consideration was given to persons in the fields of physical education in Japan, children, students, and “the Olympic Fund Raising Association” which was responsible for raising a large section of the funds required for the Tokyo Olympic Games.
    The total number of tickets allocated for overseas use was fixed at 200,000 in consideration of the available accommodation capacity in Tokyo, the yearly number of foreign visitors to Japan, and the estimated number of tickets per person, etc. The allocation frameworks for the admission tickets to be allowed each purchaser was decided on the following basis in order to provide equal opportunity to purchase tickets in each area.

  6. Life
    Posted December 23, 2009 at 6:22 am | Permalink

    This formula proved useful in judging whether or not any proposed change for any particular event would be equitable.
    In calculating the number of seats at the sites, blue-prints were used inasmuch as almost all sites were either in the process of alteration or enlargement. Some seats were reserved for emergency use.
    The calculation of the number of free seats was a matter of some difficulty, as estimates only were available of the number of the personnel under Article 48 of the Olympic Charter who would be present at each site after the Opening Ceremony, and as these seats occupied central positions, any change in the numbers of these seats would affect the arrangement of the entire stadium.
    The crescent type stand to be additionally installed in the upper part of the hackstand of the National Stadium, which was to be the main site of the Games, was originally planned as a standing room. However, in view of the administration of the site, this was changed to provide seating accommodation.
    Allocated number of tickets for regular events As in the case of the Opening and Closing Ceremonies, emphasis was laid on the general public and special consideration was given to persons in the fields of physical education in Japan, children, students, and “the Olympic Fund Raising Association” which was responsible for raising a large section of the funds required for the Tokyo Olympic Games.
    The total number of tickets allocated for overseas use was fixed at 200,000 in consideration of the available accommodation capacity in Tokyo, the yearly number of foreign visitors to Japan, and the estimated number of tickets per person, etc. The allocation frameworks for the admission tickets to be allowed each purchaser was decided on the following basis in order to provide equal opportunity to purchase tickets in each area.

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